Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Abdullah El Atrache Ceballos, Graduate (PhD.) Umul Banin Jafri, Senior Alex Clinkenbeard, Senior Colin Nix, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Umul Banin Jafri

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Divo, Eduardo A

Abstract

This project is the primary phase to develop a prototype of a lower limb exoskeleton through the implementation of novel hardware and software techniques that will overcome specific issues those current exoskeletons suffer from, such as lack of robust controllability, bulkiness, and actuation performance. At this phase, a knee exoskeleton with a linear actuator has been constructed. It is controlled by using data received from electromyography (EMG) signals. Furthermore, 3D printed parts of the exoskeleton frame have been developed in order to reduce weight and for rapid prototyping. The device is to be designed as an assistive device for a non-handicapped person. The main requirement of the device is to aim more less 20% of the knee joint torque of the average human male (20-35 years) during walking. Furthermore, preliminary studies on electromechanical properties of soft robotic materials have been performed in order to explore their capabilities for this application.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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Knee Exoskeleton Controlled by EEG and EMG Based Multi Sensor Data Fusion with Soft Robotic Actuators as Artificial Muscles

This project is the primary phase to develop a prototype of a lower limb exoskeleton through the implementation of novel hardware and software techniques that will overcome specific issues those current exoskeletons suffer from, such as lack of robust controllability, bulkiness, and actuation performance. At this phase, a knee exoskeleton with a linear actuator has been constructed. It is controlled by using data received from electromyography (EMG) signals. Furthermore, 3D printed parts of the exoskeleton frame have been developed in order to reduce weight and for rapid prototyping. The device is to be designed as an assistive device for a non-handicapped person. The main requirement of the device is to aim more less 20% of the knee joint torque of the average human male (20-35 years) during walking. Furthermore, preliminary studies on electromechanical properties of soft robotic materials have been performed in order to explore their capabilities for this application.

 

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