Abstract Title

A Voice for the Voiceless: The Progression of Feminist Science Fiction

Author Information

Elsa IngwersenFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

individual

Poster Session; 5-minute Oral Presentation; 10-minute Oral Presentation

Authors' Class Standing

Elsa Ingwersen, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Elsa Ingwersen

Faculty Mentor Name

Taryne Taylor

Abstract

This paper is a longitudinal study of feminist science fiction that analyses six representative pieces from the genre: Frankenstein (1818), Herland (1915), A Wrinkle in Time novel (1962), The Female Man (1975), A Wrinkle in Time Movie adaptation (2018), and Rupetta (2018). Looking at literature across a span of 200 years, allows one to see the chronological growth of feminist science fiction. The longitudinal study of feminist science fiction is valuable because it not only shows how the definition of feminism grows and changes to reflect issues of the time period, but also the feminist ideals that stay static throughout the centuries. This study suggests that the state of feminism is not stagnant and shows the intersectionality of feminist science fiction. By looking at a select few representative pieces of this genre, it is clear how it has adapted and changed with society over the last two hundred year to become a voice for the voiceless.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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A Voice for the Voiceless: The Progression of Feminist Science Fiction

This paper is a longitudinal study of feminist science fiction that analyses six representative pieces from the genre: Frankenstein (1818), Herland (1915), A Wrinkle in Time novel (1962), The Female Man (1975), A Wrinkle in Time Movie adaptation (2018), and Rupetta (2018). Looking at literature across a span of 200 years, allows one to see the chronological growth of feminist science fiction. The longitudinal study of feminist science fiction is valuable because it not only shows how the definition of feminism grows and changes to reflect issues of the time period, but also the feminist ideals that stay static throughout the centuries. This study suggests that the state of feminism is not stagnant and shows the intersectionality of feminist science fiction. By looking at a select few representative pieces of this genre, it is clear how it has adapted and changed with society over the last two hundred year to become a voice for the voiceless.