Abstract Title

Deconfliction of Simultaneous Multi-Vehicle Operations

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Graduate

group

Daytona Beach

Authors' Class Standing

Avinash Muthu Krishnan, Doctoral Student Dr. Kevin Adkins, Faculty Advisor Dr. Marc Compere, Faculty Advisor

Lead Presenter's Name

Avinash Muthu Krishnan

Lead Presenter's College

DB College of Engineering

Faculty Mentor Name

Marc Compere , Kevin Adkins

Abstract

Evolving technology and regulation is making package delivery via drone more feasible since Amazon first ignited the public imagination with the idea in 2013. However, additional progress needs to be made before package delivery on a large scale is viable. Some of these needs include the maturing of vehicle-to-vehicle communication, standards and decision laws that enable autonomous package delivery drones to come to consensus on delivery route selection and prioritization when multiple uncrewed aircraft (UA) converge on a single drop-off location. This work describes a two-part project that, first, simulates a package delivery scenario using the Mobility Virtual Environment (MoVE) and, secondly, physically executes the package delivery scenario on Embry-Riddle’s campus. Both the simulation and experimental execution involve solving the consensus problem with multiple unique UA, and payloads, arriving at the drop-off location at similar times.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark, SURF, Research Abroad, Student Internal Grants, or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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Deconfliction of Simultaneous Multi-Vehicle Operations

Evolving technology and regulation is making package delivery via drone more feasible since Amazon first ignited the public imagination with the idea in 2013. However, additional progress needs to be made before package delivery on a large scale is viable. Some of these needs include the maturing of vehicle-to-vehicle communication, standards and decision laws that enable autonomous package delivery drones to come to consensus on delivery route selection and prioritization when multiple uncrewed aircraft (UA) converge on a single drop-off location. This work describes a two-part project that, first, simulates a package delivery scenario using the Mobility Virtual Environment (MoVE) and, secondly, physically executes the package delivery scenario on Embry-Riddle’s campus. Both the simulation and experimental execution involve solving the consensus problem with multiple unique UA, and payloads, arriving at the drop-off location at similar times.