Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Graduate

group

Daytona Beach

Authors' Class Standing

Justin Grillot, 2nd Year MSOSM Nicole Hester, 2nd Year MSOSM Cameron Pike, 1st Year MSOSM Priscila Casado, 2nd Year MSOSM

Lead Presenter's Name

Justin Grillot

Lead Presenter's College

DB College of Aviation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Mark Friend

Abstract

College of Aviation Graduate Studies, Master of Occupational Safety Management, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach Campus, FL

Background: The primary goal of this project was to enhance graduate student learning through observation and analysis of health and safety program elements in an active commercial enterprise. A secondary purpose was to provide meaningful health and safety input to the visited company. Company participation was voluntary and based on a request made to the local chamber of commerce. The inspection was conducted in October 2021 at a Central Florida manufacturing facility.

Approach: The team evaluated employee protection by observing active production processes and analyzing health and safety performance using basic inspection and audit techniques. Pre-visit research included examination of the company website, a search of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) and an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) records review. The research did not reveal any citations or enforcement actions related to the visited facility. The visit was challenged by several limitations. The team did not have the opportunity to review company health and safety program documents. The team was not able to review the OSHA injury and illness logs and any company-maintained inspection or incident investigative reports. A facility supervisor was made available to the team during the visit and provided answers and explanations to the team as needed. Photographs were allowed and the final report to the company included a picture of the hazard and recommendations for corrective actions. The visit was limited to one three-hour period including initial briefing, facility tour, and a post-tour, open discussion period.

Results: There were forty-one safety and/or environmental hazards identified. The hazards ranged from severe (very likely probability that and injury or environmental release could happen) to minor (injury or environmental release not likely to occur). Additionally, there were seven safety recommendations that included the creation of a hazardous waste plan, incident and accident reporting, training improvements, creation of standard operating procedures, creation of an inspection program, creation of an emergency action plan, and improvements to the ventilation system to control airborne hazards.

Conclusions: The company’s willingness to accept the inspection and provide active support to the team was a positive experience. The company seemed genuinely interested in receiving the final report and getting to work on the recommendations. The team acquired a new appreciation for the regulatory struggles that a small business can have when it comes to safety and environmental compliance.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark, SURF, Research Abroad, Student Internal Grants, or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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Small business safety hazards inspection and recommendations

College of Aviation Graduate Studies, Master of Occupational Safety Management, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach Campus, FL

Background: The primary goal of this project was to enhance graduate student learning through observation and analysis of health and safety program elements in an active commercial enterprise. A secondary purpose was to provide meaningful health and safety input to the visited company. Company participation was voluntary and based on a request made to the local chamber of commerce. The inspection was conducted in October 2021 at a Central Florida manufacturing facility.

Approach: The team evaluated employee protection by observing active production processes and analyzing health and safety performance using basic inspection and audit techniques. Pre-visit research included examination of the company website, a search of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) and an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) records review. The research did not reveal any citations or enforcement actions related to the visited facility. The visit was challenged by several limitations. The team did not have the opportunity to review company health and safety program documents. The team was not able to review the OSHA injury and illness logs and any company-maintained inspection or incident investigative reports. A facility supervisor was made available to the team during the visit and provided answers and explanations to the team as needed. Photographs were allowed and the final report to the company included a picture of the hazard and recommendations for corrective actions. The visit was limited to one three-hour period including initial briefing, facility tour, and a post-tour, open discussion period.

Results: There were forty-one safety and/or environmental hazards identified. The hazards ranged from severe (very likely probability that and injury or environmental release could happen) to minor (injury or environmental release not likely to occur). Additionally, there were seven safety recommendations that included the creation of a hazardous waste plan, incident and accident reporting, training improvements, creation of standard operating procedures, creation of an inspection program, creation of an emergency action plan, and improvements to the ventilation system to control airborne hazards.

Conclusions: The company’s willingness to accept the inspection and provide active support to the team was a positive experience. The company seemed genuinely interested in receiving the final report and getting to work on the recommendations. The team acquired a new appreciation for the regulatory struggles that a small business can have when it comes to safety and environmental compliance.