Event Title

Revising Asynchronous Instruction Delivery to First Year Seminars

Presenter Information

Tammy Ivins, Tammy IvinsFollow

Session Format

Workshop

Conference Tracks

Library Instruction and Instruction Design

Short Description

Information literacy instruction is a mandatory component of First Year Seminars at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Randall Library delivers this in a flipped format, by providing students with asynchronous online outside-of-class content that complements a face-to-face course session led by a librarian. Through “Appreciate Inquiry”-driven process, we converted this online content to be available as downloadable modules in the Canvas Commons. This paper will discuss our process, the specific features in Canvas that we used to achieve the project goals, and areas of future growth for the project.

Long Description

Information literacy instruction is a mandatory component of First Year Seminars at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Randall Library delivers this in a flipped format, by providing students with asynchronous online outside-of-class content that complements a face-to-face course session led by a librarian. These flipped materials were previously delivered via a series of websites: a video tour, a. html website (based on the University of Notre Dame’s ‘Pot of Gold’), and electronic forms. Using Appreciative Inquiry (AI) principles, we set out to revise the delivery of this content. Through the AI process, we discovered the strengths of our existing content, dreamed-up aspirational goals for growing the content, designed a new delivery mechanism in Canvas (our course management system), and delivered the new product via downloadable modules in the Canvas Commons. Critical “dreams” were: facilitating easy updating of the content, easing the class instructors time-burden of grading, mandating completion of every step in the flipped content, and integrating the flipped content more closely into the face-to-face instruction. These goals were achieved through the move to Canvas and features such as quizzes, ungraded surveys, and progress requirements. This paper will discuss our AI-guided process, the specific features in Canvas that we used to achieve the project goals, and areas of future growth for the project.

Learning Objectives

  • How to use the Appreciate Inquiry process to guide project development
  • How to use advanced Canvas features to require student completion of content in sequence
  • How to publish learning content to the Canvas Commons

Comments

Interaction Strategies

  • I will use polleverywhere to learn more about my audience (for example: what CMS does your institution have? Have you ever created a module for that CMS? Do you use flipped instruction regularly?), as well as ask the audience to reflect on what we have talked about and how they could apply it (for example: What project, process, or service do you think you could use Appreciative Inquiry to revise?).

Intended Audience

  • Academic librarians

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Revising Asynchronous Instruction Delivery to First Year Seminars

Information literacy instruction is a mandatory component of First Year Seminars at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Randall Library delivers this in a flipped format, by providing students with asynchronous online outside-of-class content that complements a face-to-face course session led by a librarian. Through “Appreciate Inquiry”-driven process, we converted this online content to be available as downloadable modules in the Canvas Commons. This paper will discuss our process, the specific features in Canvas that we used to achieve the project goals, and areas of future growth for the project.