Title

Airport Operations Delays and Possible Mitigation Through Electric Taxi Systems

Presenter Email

crossaf6@erau.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Start Date

3-4-2020 10:45 AM

End Date

3-4-2020 12:15 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Managing the National Airspace System: What role should government play?

Keywords

Airport Delays, Airport Congestion, Electric Taxi Systems, Ground Delays

Abstract

Airline departures, not including private aircraft, increased from 25,143 in 2000 to 36,722 in 2017. More passengers necessitate more aircraft and more flights. With more aircraft at terminals, ground delays, based on current airport design, will continue to increase. Systems that allow for reduced aircraft time on the ground will improve airline economics and airport operations, in addition, will reduce airline delays both for departure and arrival at the gate. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore the efficacy, from ramp controllers’ perspectives, of equipping airliners with an electric taxi system. Prototype electric taxi systems have shown a savings of up to 10 minutes for an aircraft to pushback and depart the ramp area. A case study methodology was employed to examine the various aspects of four representative airports regarding the potential implementation of the electric taxi system. Results showed that although ramp controllers saw economic and environmental benefits to an electric taxi system, most believed that these systems would not save time in and out of the ramp entry and exit areas due to limitations of airport design. There is still conflict between ramp controllers (working for airlines) and ground controllers (government employees) on efficient aircraft movement. Releasing control of more airport ground areas, to the ramp controllers, would be far more effective in reducing gate delays.

Presenter Biography

Dr. Kristy Kiernan is the curriculum chair for the College of Aeronautics Graduate Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Formerly, she was Program Chair for the Master of Science in Unmanned Systems. She is a member of several UAS industry working groups, including the ANSI UAS Standardization Collaborative and the AUVSI Trusted Operator Program. Her research interests are in unmanned systems, safety, risk management, and human factors. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience from Brown University, a Ph.D. in Aviation from ERAU, an Airline Transport Pilot Rating with a Falcon type rating, and a Remote Pilot Certificate.

View Kristy Kiernan's Bio Page

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Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Airport Operations Delays and Possible Mitigation Through Electric Taxi Systems

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Airline departures, not including private aircraft, increased from 25,143 in 2000 to 36,722 in 2017. More passengers necessitate more aircraft and more flights. With more aircraft at terminals, ground delays, based on current airport design, will continue to increase. Systems that allow for reduced aircraft time on the ground will improve airline economics and airport operations, in addition, will reduce airline delays both for departure and arrival at the gate. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore the efficacy, from ramp controllers’ perspectives, of equipping airliners with an electric taxi system. Prototype electric taxi systems have shown a savings of up to 10 minutes for an aircraft to pushback and depart the ramp area. A case study methodology was employed to examine the various aspects of four representative airports regarding the potential implementation of the electric taxi system. Results showed that although ramp controllers saw economic and environmental benefits to an electric taxi system, most believed that these systems would not save time in and out of the ramp entry and exit areas due to limitations of airport design. There is still conflict between ramp controllers (working for airlines) and ground controllers (government employees) on efficient aircraft movement. Releasing control of more airport ground areas, to the ramp controllers, would be far more effective in reducing gate delays.