Title

Civil Applications of sUAS Swarms

Presenter Email

herveyt2@my.erau.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

Start Date

3-2-2020 8:00 AM

End Date

3-2-2020 9:30 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Other Topic Area

Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) Swarms - Civil Applications

Keywords

sUAS, UAS, drone swarms, drones, future vertical lift, FVL, vertical takeoff and lift, VTOL

Abstract

Small UAS (sUAS) swarm technology, also referred to as drone swarms—the capability of numerous drones, as a “swarm,” to autonomously generate decisions based on shared information, conditions of the environment, and react to the laws of physics more efficiently than a biological organism. With each passing day, sciences in algorithms, energy, and the menagerie of engineering disciplines inch us ever closer to the “Singularity” theory/prediction proposed in the book, The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, written by acclaimed futurist Ray Kurzweil. It is a reasonable assumption to say that these swarms will soon be applied to a great many applications to virtually all areas of homeland security, foreign conflicts, and commercial applications. For the sake of this NTAS we will focus on aerial drone sUAS swarms, however, the other physical domains of air, land, sea, and space will also be inundated with similar entities.

Many technological innovations that initially entered existence as purely military capability, ultimately enriched our daily lives such as the Air Force’s Global Positioning System (GPS). So how do we as a society leverage sUAS swarms to our advantage to enhance our well-being? sUAS swarms could become the next “drug sniffing” dogs of the skies, by the dozens or hundreds. They could patrol the border, coastlines, and conduct environmental monitoring of would-be poachers. They could assist search and rescue first responders to locate victims and quickly identify, report, and pursue violent criminals. The applications are seemingly limitless, and it is time to begin planning now to ensure the safe and responsible use of the technology.

Presenter Biography

Tyler Paul Hervey is an Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Worldwide campus student pursuing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering simultaneous with an Associate in Science Degree in Aeronautics. He is a 17-year Army Active Duty Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Instructor Operator and Sergeant First Class (Promotable), producing future UAS training and doctrine programs with the United States Army Aviation Center of Excellence (USAACE) in Fort Rucker, AL. He also specializes in space operations and the electromagnetic spectrum. Tyler has been published in Aviation Digest and other published items pertaining to UAS and aviation as a whole such as the Aviation Digest article entitled, “The Army, NASA, and Their Shared DNA in Space Exploration,” (Hervey, 2019, p. 38-41). The article is available via PDF at https://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00047609/00025

View Tyler Hervey's Bio Page

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Mar 2nd, 8:00 AM Mar 2nd, 9:30 AM

Civil Applications of sUAS Swarms

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

Small UAS (sUAS) swarm technology, also referred to as drone swarms—the capability of numerous drones, as a “swarm,” to autonomously generate decisions based on shared information, conditions of the environment, and react to the laws of physics more efficiently than a biological organism. With each passing day, sciences in algorithms, energy, and the menagerie of engineering disciplines inch us ever closer to the “Singularity” theory/prediction proposed in the book, The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, written by acclaimed futurist Ray Kurzweil. It is a reasonable assumption to say that these swarms will soon be applied to a great many applications to virtually all areas of homeland security, foreign conflicts, and commercial applications. For the sake of this NTAS we will focus on aerial drone sUAS swarms, however, the other physical domains of air, land, sea, and space will also be inundated with similar entities.

Many technological innovations that initially entered existence as purely military capability, ultimately enriched our daily lives such as the Air Force’s Global Positioning System (GPS). So how do we as a society leverage sUAS swarms to our advantage to enhance our well-being? sUAS swarms could become the next “drug sniffing” dogs of the skies, by the dozens or hundreds. They could patrol the border, coastlines, and conduct environmental monitoring of would-be poachers. They could assist search and rescue first responders to locate victims and quickly identify, report, and pursue violent criminals. The applications are seemingly limitless, and it is time to begin planning now to ensure the safe and responsible use of the technology.