Presenter Email

karen.johnson@siu.edu, mhebel@siu.edu

Submission Type

Abstract - Paper/Presentation Only

Topic Area

Virtual Reality / Augmented Reality / Mixed Reality in Aviation Training; Research highlighting the benefits of virtual and augmented training applications

Keywords

Hydraulics system sandbox, feedback, aviation maintenance training

Abstract

The proposed presentation will include the following project and results from implementation in an aircraft hydraulic systems course.

In 2020 we developed a digital hydraulics system schematic sandbox for use in an FAA Part 147 airframe maintenance technician training program (See Figure 1). The sandbox allows students to drag-drop-connect components used in systems such as those found in aircraft. It allows them to ‘test-connect’ the components to get feedback on correct and incorrect ‘construction’. As shown in Figure 1, light green ‘hoses’ are correct supply connections, dark green are correct return connections and red are incorrect connections per established rules of actual use. The student is not restricted how they build the system allowing an open system for applying their understanding.

The sandbox was used in 2021 and results regarding its effectiveness were collected. As with any research project, further research goals are always recognized as one of the results. In this case, based on qualitative feedback from the students who used the sandbox in 2021, the next version of the sandbox includes textual feedback. The text-based feedback consists of a small pop-up box that includes a written explanation of why the connection is incorrect. Results from this round of the sandbox will be collected in spring 2022 to determine the effectiveness of the text feedback.

Previous research on different modalities of feedback indicates that while graphic feedback does aid in learning, it may not be sufficient in providing an understanding that allows for verbal explanation (Reiber, 1996). Likewise, Park and Gittleman (1992) found that with increased complexity of a task feedback may require a verbal explanation for students to understand and evaluate their performance.

Park, O. C., & Gittelman, S. S. (1992). Selective use of animation and feedback in computer-based instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 40(4), 27-38.

Rieber, L. P. (1996). Animation as feedback in a computer-based simulation: Representation matters. Educational technology research and development, 44(1), 5-22.

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Improved Feedback Mechanisms of the Hydraulics Sandbox Simulator

The proposed presentation will include the following project and results from implementation in an aircraft hydraulic systems course.

In 2020 we developed a digital hydraulics system schematic sandbox for use in an FAA Part 147 airframe maintenance technician training program (See Figure 1). The sandbox allows students to drag-drop-connect components used in systems such as those found in aircraft. It allows them to ‘test-connect’ the components to get feedback on correct and incorrect ‘construction’. As shown in Figure 1, light green ‘hoses’ are correct supply connections, dark green are correct return connections and red are incorrect connections per established rules of actual use. The student is not restricted how they build the system allowing an open system for applying their understanding.

The sandbox was used in 2021 and results regarding its effectiveness were collected. As with any research project, further research goals are always recognized as one of the results. In this case, based on qualitative feedback from the students who used the sandbox in 2021, the next version of the sandbox includes textual feedback. The text-based feedback consists of a small pop-up box that includes a written explanation of why the connection is incorrect. Results from this round of the sandbox will be collected in spring 2022 to determine the effectiveness of the text feedback.

Previous research on different modalities of feedback indicates that while graphic feedback does aid in learning, it may not be sufficient in providing an understanding that allows for verbal explanation (Reiber, 1996). Likewise, Park and Gittleman (1992) found that with increased complexity of a task feedback may require a verbal explanation for students to understand and evaluate their performance.

Park, O. C., & Gittelman, S. S. (1992). Selective use of animation and feedback in computer-based instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 40(4), 27-38.

Rieber, L. P. (1996). Animation as feedback in a computer-based simulation: Representation matters. Educational technology research and development, 44(1), 5-22.

 

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