Abstract Title

The Dipole Antenna Radio Telescope (DART)

Faculty Mentor Name

Andri Gretarsson

Format Preference

Poster

Abstract

The Dipole Antenna Radio Telescope (DART) array consists of 48, dual-polarization, dipole antennas optimized for the 80 – 300 MHz range of frequency, being used to do radio astronomy. Radio Astronomy is a field of astronomy that studies celestial objects through radio waves. Radio waves have a long wavelength and a low frequency, thus allowing them to travel through the cosmic dust in the universe. This array of antennas is special because it is fully steerable without any moving parts. Having steerable antennas allows for a larger range of viewing, and with this particular telescope, it is fully steerable above 30 degrees. These antennas are arranged in the form of three 4 x 4 arrays, and are spread around Embry-Riddle’s radio observatory. The main goal of DART is to detect pulsars, which are highly magnetized rotating neutron stars that emit a beam of electromagnetic radiation from its poles, usually in the form of radio waves. Pulsars show extreme physical concepts of density, gravity, magnetic fields, and electric fields, which make them a very elaborate object to study.

Poster Presentation

IGNITE Grant Award

Location

AC1-Atrium, Eagle Gym

Start Date

3-23-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

3-23-2018 9:00 PM

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Mar 23rd, 11:00 AM Mar 23rd, 9:00 PM

The Dipole Antenna Radio Telescope (DART)

AC1-Atrium, Eagle Gym

The Dipole Antenna Radio Telescope (DART) array consists of 48, dual-polarization, dipole antennas optimized for the 80 – 300 MHz range of frequency, being used to do radio astronomy. Radio Astronomy is a field of astronomy that studies celestial objects through radio waves. Radio waves have a long wavelength and a low frequency, thus allowing them to travel through the cosmic dust in the universe. This array of antennas is special because it is fully steerable without any moving parts. Having steerable antennas allows for a larger range of viewing, and with this particular telescope, it is fully steerable above 30 degrees. These antennas are arranged in the form of three 4 x 4 arrays, and are spread around Embry-Riddle’s radio observatory. The main goal of DART is to detect pulsars, which are highly magnetized rotating neutron stars that emit a beam of electromagnetic radiation from its poles, usually in the form of radio waves. Pulsars show extreme physical concepts of density, gravity, magnetic fields, and electric fields, which make them a very elaborate object to study.

Poster Presentation

IGNITE Grant Award