Faculty Mentor Name

Shigeo Hayashibara

Format Preference

Poster

Abstract

The prevention of stall on aircraft wings has been a great challenge over the history of airplanes. As the aircraft become more and more complex, it becomes harder to fit high lift devices and leading-edge devices onto high camber, supercritical airfoil aircraft wings. In the fighter jet class of aircraft the obstacle of stall is usually delayed by the implementation of leading-edge root extensions or strakes. Strakes create a tip vortice along the sharp leading edge that transitions over the surface of the wing preventing separation on both the upper and lower surface of the wing allowing the fighter jet to experience higher angles of attack. Implementation of a strake has been proven to be effective on thin, low aspect ratio wings since there is not an aggressive curve that vortice must overcome at the leading edge of the wing. In this study, using Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) via the Department of Defense’s new program HPCMP Create Genesis we are creating a series of geometry sets that will be run though the CFD flow simulation program to show what each iteration of strake does for a conventional NACA airfoil with camber and a much thicker cross section and if strakes aid in delaying onset of stall allowing aircraft, such as passenger planes, to safely operate at higher angles of attack. This information can be of great use as it can help prevent airline crashes that involve stall at take-off.

  • POSTER PRESENTATION
  • IGNITE AWARD

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Aircraft Leading Edge Strakes on Conventional NACA Wings

The prevention of stall on aircraft wings has been a great challenge over the history of airplanes. As the aircraft become more and more complex, it becomes harder to fit high lift devices and leading-edge devices onto high camber, supercritical airfoil aircraft wings. In the fighter jet class of aircraft the obstacle of stall is usually delayed by the implementation of leading-edge root extensions or strakes. Strakes create a tip vortice along the sharp leading edge that transitions over the surface of the wing preventing separation on both the upper and lower surface of the wing allowing the fighter jet to experience higher angles of attack. Implementation of a strake has been proven to be effective on thin, low aspect ratio wings since there is not an aggressive curve that vortice must overcome at the leading edge of the wing. In this study, using Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) via the Department of Defense’s new program HPCMP Create Genesis we are creating a series of geometry sets that will be run though the CFD flow simulation program to show what each iteration of strake does for a conventional NACA airfoil with camber and a much thicker cross section and if strakes aid in delaying onset of stall allowing aircraft, such as passenger planes, to safely operate at higher angles of attack. This information can be of great use as it can help prevent airline crashes that involve stall at take-off.

  • POSTER PRESENTATION
  • IGNITE AWARD