Faculty Mentor Name

Daniel Dannelley

Format Preference

Poster

Abstract

The use of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) in power cycles has been fairly new in the last decade. Due to this, there is a lack in research for both terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. The purpose of this project is to utilize sCO2 as a working fluid and design and optimize a Brayton Cycle based heat exchanger on the Martian surface. Due to the lack of water on Mars, this research will provide a stronger analysis of planetary based drycooling processes in low atmospheric pressure and colder temperatures. We have been conducting an in-depth analysis of the heat exchanger by modeling and validating the changing variables and parameters of sCO2. These include how the density, critical temperature, and velocity of sCO2 will change due to pressure and temperature within the heat exchanger. We are also designing and conducting an analysis of the inside and outside geometries of the heat exchanger and which materials will be the most appropriate for transportation and efficiency. This research will provide an analysis of sCO2 as a working fluid as well as dry-cooling processes for space exploration applications.

  • POSTER PRESENTATION
  • IGNITE AWARD

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Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Based Heat Exchanger on the Martian

The use of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) in power cycles has been fairly new in the last decade. Due to this, there is a lack in research for both terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. The purpose of this project is to utilize sCO2 as a working fluid and design and optimize a Brayton Cycle based heat exchanger on the Martian surface. Due to the lack of water on Mars, this research will provide a stronger analysis of planetary based drycooling processes in low atmospheric pressure and colder temperatures. We have been conducting an in-depth analysis of the heat exchanger by modeling and validating the changing variables and parameters of sCO2. These include how the density, critical temperature, and velocity of sCO2 will change due to pressure and temperature within the heat exchanger. We are also designing and conducting an analysis of the inside and outside geometries of the heat exchanger and which materials will be the most appropriate for transportation and efficiency. This research will provide an analysis of sCO2 as a working fluid as well as dry-cooling processes for space exploration applications.

  • POSTER PRESENTATION
  • IGNITE AWARD