Abstract Title

Human-Robot versus Human-Human Relationship Impact on Comfort Levels Regarding In Home Privacy

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

When considering in-group vs. out-group concepts, certain degrees of human relationships naturally assume one of two categories. Roles such as immediate and extended family members and friends tend to fit quite nicely in the in-group category. Strangers, hired help, as well as acquaintances would likely be members of the out-group category due to a lack of personal relation to the perceiver. Though an out-group member may possess cultural, socioeconomic, or religious traits that an individual may perceive as in-group, the fact that they are an unknown stranger should immediately place them in the out-group. From [K1] this notion, it can be inferred that comfort levels, regarding the privacy of an individual's home, would be impacted quite heavily by the presence of a stranger, as opposed [K2] to a family member or a friend. The intention [K3] of this involves the consideration a robotic entity in the equation. How does a robot impact in home comfort levels regarding certain rooms as compared to a family member (immediate, or extended), friend, acquaintance, stranger, or hired help? Participants will be presented with a series of situations, each involving one of the seven degrees of relation. After each trial they will provide self-report of their comfort levels regarding their experience. This study is designed to compare the levels of comfort with robots and the other six degrees of relation in regards to spaces in the home. Additionally, results of this study may present the opportunity to evaluate a multicultural dimension of robotic acceptance.

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Human-Robot versus Human-Human Relationship Impact on Comfort Levels Regarding In Home Privacy

When considering in-group vs. out-group concepts, certain degrees of human relationships naturally assume one of two categories. Roles such as immediate and extended family members and friends tend to fit quite nicely in the in-group category. Strangers, hired help, as well as acquaintances would likely be members of the out-group category due to a lack of personal relation to the perceiver. Though an out-group member may possess cultural, socioeconomic, or religious traits that an individual may perceive as in-group, the fact that they are an unknown stranger should immediately place them in the out-group. From [K1] this notion, it can be inferred that comfort levels, regarding the privacy of an individual's home, would be impacted quite heavily by the presence of a stranger, as opposed [K2] to a family member or a friend. The intention [K3] of this involves the consideration a robotic entity in the equation. How does a robot impact in home comfort levels regarding certain rooms as compared to a family member (immediate, or extended), friend, acquaintance, stranger, or hired help? Participants will be presented with a series of situations, each involving one of the seven degrees of relation. After each trial they will provide self-report of their comfort levels regarding their experience. This study is designed to compare the levels of comfort with robots and the other six degrees of relation in regards to spaces in the home. Additionally, results of this study may present the opportunity to evaluate a multicultural dimension of robotic acceptance.