Presenter Email

wigginsm@erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

15-8-2017 10:00 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Pilot supply

Keywords

Pilot supply, Pilot shortage

Abstract

The industry is experiencing a hiring spree that is unlike anything experienced during the past 30 years. The number of new pilots entering the airline industry is challenging both airlines and collegiate aviation in both positive and potentially negative ways. New relationships are being developed as airlines partner with colleges and universities in their quest to meet their personnel needs of the future. The pilot shortage currently facing the industry has airlines looking directly to collegiate aviation for a steady supply of new pilots via pilot hiring agreements. The agreements, known by various names, all contain the same element of offering recent graduates a quicker path to the airline cockpit. A key element that is necessary to meet the challenges faced by both groups is enhancing the skills of those graduating in ways to help overcome of the concerns about pilots with less experience than in the past. To help aspiring professional pilots from collegiate programs meet the expectations of industry, the airlines should provide consider assisting collegiate programs gain access to the resources necessary to keep all programs current and relevant regarding the expectations of the industry. This can include training for faculty so we can build better curricula and inclusion in industry meetings and working groups. When the industry finds solutions to operational and safety-related problems, they can provide this information to their collegiate partners so the next generation of pilots can be better prepared. Collegiate aviation can provide a test-bed for new training ideas and methods so the airlines do not have to spend valuable time and money on new but untested ideas. The relationship should be the foundation to ensuring pilots entering the profession have a baseline of skills and knowledge that will promote success as they transition into that phase of their profession. If this is successful, airlines should experience lower training costs for lower-time pilots because the baseline of knowledge and skills will be higher. The purpose of this discussion is to exchange ideas between all concerned about how to meet the challenges we all face over the next decade or two.

Comments

Presented during Session 4: Pilot Supply Problem

Presenter Biography

View Michael Wiggins’ Bio Page

1109 Wiggins.pptx (4637 kB)
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Aug 15th, 9:00 AM Aug 15th, 10:00 AM

A Fresh Look at the Industry and Collegiate Aviation Partnership: A Discussion about the Future

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

The industry is experiencing a hiring spree that is unlike anything experienced during the past 30 years. The number of new pilots entering the airline industry is challenging both airlines and collegiate aviation in both positive and potentially negative ways. New relationships are being developed as airlines partner with colleges and universities in their quest to meet their personnel needs of the future. The pilot shortage currently facing the industry has airlines looking directly to collegiate aviation for a steady supply of new pilots via pilot hiring agreements. The agreements, known by various names, all contain the same element of offering recent graduates a quicker path to the airline cockpit. A key element that is necessary to meet the challenges faced by both groups is enhancing the skills of those graduating in ways to help overcome of the concerns about pilots with less experience than in the past. To help aspiring professional pilots from collegiate programs meet the expectations of industry, the airlines should provide consider assisting collegiate programs gain access to the resources necessary to keep all programs current and relevant regarding the expectations of the industry. This can include training for faculty so we can build better curricula and inclusion in industry meetings and working groups. When the industry finds solutions to operational and safety-related problems, they can provide this information to their collegiate partners so the next generation of pilots can be better prepared. Collegiate aviation can provide a test-bed for new training ideas and methods so the airlines do not have to spend valuable time and money on new but untested ideas. The relationship should be the foundation to ensuring pilots entering the profession have a baseline of skills and knowledge that will promote success as they transition into that phase of their profession. If this is successful, airlines should experience lower training costs for lower-time pilots because the baseline of knowledge and skills will be higher. The purpose of this discussion is to exchange ideas between all concerned about how to meet the challenges we all face over the next decade or two.

 

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