Title

Flight School Capacity in the U.S. - Turbulence Ahead?

Presenter Email

matt@flightpath-economics.com

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

15-8-2017 10:00 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Pilot supply

Keywords

flight training, pilot supply, aviation economics

Abstract

For over a generation, U.S. air carriers have relied almost exclusively on external third parties for basic “ab initio” pilot training. As demand for pilots increases, as the supply of available pilots continues to dwindle, and as the U.S. military attempts to limit attrition of trained military pilots, civilian flight training infrastructure is facing extreme pressure and may not have the ability to produce either the volume or quality of pilots required by U.S. air carriers. It is increasingly important that we understand the capacity, quality, durability, and limitations of basic “ab initio” flight training here in the United States. To address these concerns, Flightpath Economics, in partnership with the National Association of Flight Instructors (NAFI) and several U.S. air carriers, is conducting a comprehensive survey of flight school training capability in the United States. The summary findings of this original research will be presented during the pilot supply summit portion of NTAS 2017.

Comments

Presented during Session 4: Pilot Supply Problem

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Aug 15th, 9:00 AM Aug 15th, 10:00 AM

Flight School Capacity in the U.S. - Turbulence Ahead?

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

For over a generation, U.S. air carriers have relied almost exclusively on external third parties for basic “ab initio” pilot training. As demand for pilots increases, as the supply of available pilots continues to dwindle, and as the U.S. military attempts to limit attrition of trained military pilots, civilian flight training infrastructure is facing extreme pressure and may not have the ability to produce either the volume or quality of pilots required by U.S. air carriers. It is increasingly important that we understand the capacity, quality, durability, and limitations of basic “ab initio” flight training here in the United States. To address these concerns, Flightpath Economics, in partnership with the National Association of Flight Instructors (NAFI) and several U.S. air carriers, is conducting a comprehensive survey of flight school training capability in the United States. The summary findings of this original research will be presented during the pilot supply summit portion of NTAS 2017.