Presenter Email

thomasr7@erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

16-8-2017 8:15 AM

End Date

16-8-2017 9:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Flight training

Keywords

Aviation weather, flight training, pilot knowledge, general aviation, weather

Abstract

While accident trends in General Aviation (GA) have decreased overall, accidents rates involving weather have remained relatively consistent over the past 10 years. An assessment was developed and validated to assess if GA pilots lack adequate knowledge of aviation weather concepts. The assessment consisted of a 95 question Aviation Weather Knowledge multiple-choice test covering weather phenomena, aviation weather products, and aviation weather product sources. 204 GA pilots completed the knowledge questions along with an aviation weather self-efficacy (confidence) survey. Results indicated that while instrument rated commercial pilots demonstrated the highest levels of knowledge, their scores were only moderate – around 65% correct. Private pilots had scores in the 60% range. These results may indicate that pilots flying in GA operations have a relatively low level of aviation weather knowledge. Weather self-efficacy was correlated positively with aviation weather knowledge.

Presenter Biography

Robert "Bob" Thomas is an Assistant Professor in the Aeronautical Science Department at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Daytona Beach campus. In addition to teaching classes, Bob manages the College of Aviation’s Aviation Learning Center (a free tutoring center for aviation students) and is a Flight and Check Instructor under the ERAU’s 141 Pilot School Certificate.

Bob received his pilot and flight instructor certificates and Bachelor of Science in Aviation Human Factors with a minor in Atmospheric Science from the University of Illinois. He has a Master of Science in Aeronautics Degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University with concentrations in Aviation Weather and Education Technology. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Aviation from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Before coming to ERAU to work as a flight instructor in 2007, Bob was a flight instructor at the University of Illinois and at Central Illinois Air in Mattoon, IL. He also was an on-air weather broadcaster on both AM radio and TV for approximately three years and has experience as the Director of the evening newscasts for WICD, an ABC affiliate, and production work at WILL, a PBS affiliate, both located in central Illinois.

Bob has been flying since 2000, has over 3000 flight hours, and holds the following FAA certificates and ratings: Airline Transport Pilot ASEL & AMEL; Gold Seal Flight Instructor ASE, AME, & Instrument-Airplane; Ground Instructor-Advanced; and Remote Pilot-SUAS.

View Robert Thomas' Bio Page

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Aug 16th, 8:15 AM Aug 16th, 9:45 AM

Assessing General Aviation Pilots' Weather Knowledge and Self-Efficacy

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

While accident trends in General Aviation (GA) have decreased overall, accidents rates involving weather have remained relatively consistent over the past 10 years. An assessment was developed and validated to assess if GA pilots lack adequate knowledge of aviation weather concepts. The assessment consisted of a 95 question Aviation Weather Knowledge multiple-choice test covering weather phenomena, aviation weather products, and aviation weather product sources. 204 GA pilots completed the knowledge questions along with an aviation weather self-efficacy (confidence) survey. Results indicated that while instrument rated commercial pilots demonstrated the highest levels of knowledge, their scores were only moderate – around 65% correct. Private pilots had scores in the 60% range. These results may indicate that pilots flying in GA operations have a relatively low level of aviation weather knowledge. Weather self-efficacy was correlated positively with aviation weather knowledge.

 

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