Event Title

Masters Category - Thermomechanical Simulation of Aerogel/RTV Based Cryogenic Propellant Tank

Presenter Information

Dalton Bowen, University of Memphis

Start Date

5-4-2021 11:00 AM

End Date

5-4-2021 11:30 AM

Document Type

Presentation

Abstract

Developing an effective solution for long duration storage of cryogenic liquids is critical for future, manned space exploration missions. Current storage tanks are made of metals such as steel, aluminum or composites. Although these materials have high mechanical strength, their relatively high thermal conductivity is a disadvantage with regards to heat infiltration into the cryogenic liquid. The influx of heat into the tank causes the cryogenic liquid to vaporize, increasing the pressure in the tank. To regulate the tank pressure, current tanks vent some of the vapor. To reduce tank pressurization rates, novel materials with lower thermal conductivities such as RTV-655 and aerogels have been developed which may be feasible for space applications. Previous experiments with small-scale RTV-655 and Aerogel/RTV-655 tanks were performed to obtain stress and strain histories as a function of temperature and pressure. Due to the complexity and costs of performing additional experiments, a thermomechanical computational model is desired to further study the feasibility of using these novel materials for space applications. A thermochemical finite element simulation is used to model the cooldown and pressurization phases of the RTV-655 and RTV-655/Aerogel experiments. Simulation predictions are presented and compared to the experiment measurements.

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Apr 5th, 11:00 AM Apr 5th, 11:30 AM

Masters Category - Thermomechanical Simulation of Aerogel/RTV Based Cryogenic Propellant Tank

Developing an effective solution for long duration storage of cryogenic liquids is critical for future, manned space exploration missions. Current storage tanks are made of metals such as steel, aluminum or composites. Although these materials have high mechanical strength, their relatively high thermal conductivity is a disadvantage with regards to heat infiltration into the cryogenic liquid. The influx of heat into the tank causes the cryogenic liquid to vaporize, increasing the pressure in the tank. To regulate the tank pressure, current tanks vent some of the vapor. To reduce tank pressurization rates, novel materials with lower thermal conductivities such as RTV-655 and aerogels have been developed which may be feasible for space applications. Previous experiments with small-scale RTV-655 and Aerogel/RTV-655 tanks were performed to obtain stress and strain histories as a function of temperature and pressure. Due to the complexity and costs of performing additional experiments, a thermomechanical computational model is desired to further study the feasibility of using these novel materials for space applications. A thermochemical finite element simulation is used to model the cooldown and pressurization phases of the RTV-655 and RTV-655/Aerogel experiments. Simulation predictions are presented and compared to the experiment measurements.