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Abstract

Abstract

The article discusses complacency and the five hazardous attitudes in the context that the five hazardous attitudes are a subset of complacency. On the list of 12 most common contributors to aircraft accidents, the FAA lists complacency as the second most often contributor. Complacency implies that there is a level of satisfaction with the present circumstances without any consideration of future unseen potential dangers. Attitude embodies the concept that a person has a predisposed response to certain stimuli. Complacency manifests itself in the form of the five hazardous attitudes: (a) anti-authority, (b) impulsivity, (c) invulnerability, (d) macho, and (e) resignation. Analysis of the 2001 Gulfstream III accident in Aspen, CO revealed disregard for federal, state, and local regulations in addition to the violation of company policies. The crew executed a prohibited approach and descended below the minimum descent altitude without the proper visual cues. The crew knew the correct protocols, but they chose to disregard them. The crew of the GIV accident in Bedford, MA neglected to complete the five required checklists including the Before Starting Engines checklist to the Lineup checklist on 98% of the previous 175 flights. The crew attempted this takeoff with the flight controls locked. During their respective flight segments, each crew exhibited the five hazardous attitudes. Both crews knew the correct standards of performance although neither crew met those standards. Both crews were professionally trained and experienced. The respective flight crews were complacent, and they exhibited that complacency through the five hazardous attitudes.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.15394/ijaaa.2022.1677

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