Title

Measuring Fatigue and Sleepiness in Collegiate Aviation Pilots

Presenter Email

keller64@purdue.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Start Date

3-2-2020 9:30 AM

End Date

3-2-2020 10:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Incorporating Human Factors; Incorporating Human Factors

Keywords

Human factors, fatigue, collegiate aviation, pilots

Abstract

The National Transportation Safety Board has communicated the need to reduce fatigue related accidents through the top ten most wanted list. Additionally, the International Civil Aviation Organization and Federal Aviation Administration have continuously promoted fatigue risk management. Most fatigue related research as well as safety standards in aviation involve air carrier and military operations. However, there has been a recent revival of fatigue related research in collegiate aviation. A recent study found that 85% of collegiate aviation pilots (n = 141) reported fatigue negatively impacted their flight training activities. Results of a qualitative study indicated poor knowledge and behaviors by Part 141 collegiate aviation students (n = 35) regarding quality and quantity of sleep, decision-making processes, and lifestyle choices.

The current research study examines the sleepiness and fatigue of collegiate aviation pilots using self-reported scales. The Karolinska Sleepiness and the Samn-Perelli Scales measure the level of sleepiness and fatigue states, respectively. Thirty students (n = 30) were asked to track their fatigue and sleepiness levels four times a day, once a week, for four months, during the 2019 Fall academic semester. Researchers expect to gain a clearer understanding of how time of the day, day of the week, and month effect sleepiness and fatigue levels during flight operations in a collegiate aviation environment. Understanding these factors may help provide better safety promotion efforts such as training and education, fatigue awareness, and fatigue risk management standards. Findings of this study and opportunities for future research will be discussed.

Presenter Biography

Julius Keller is an Assistant Professor in the School of Aviation and Transportation Technology at Purdue University. He is an active Certified Flight Instructor with airplane single- and multi-engine, and instrument-airplane ratings. Prior to entering academics, Dr. Keller gained experience as a charter pilot in a Piper Navajo. He also managed multi-modal transportation and logistics for numerous Fortune 500 Companies.

Dr. Keller’s primary scholarly areas in aviation include general aviation human factors, collegiate aviation safety, training, and education. His research has been acknowledged by the Federal Aviation Administration and the University Aviation Association.

In addition to his scholarship, he has been recognized for his leadership efforts involving women and underrepresented minorities in collegiate aviation. Dr. Keller is the faculty advisor for the Women in Aviation Purdue Chapter, a member of the University Aviation Association, and Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

Dr. Keller teaches courses pertaining to advanced aircraft systems, advanced navigation, multi-cultural team operations, and aviation management.

View Julius Keller’s Bio Page

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Mar 2nd, 9:30 AM Mar 2nd, 10:45 AM

Measuring Fatigue and Sleepiness in Collegiate Aviation Pilots

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

The National Transportation Safety Board has communicated the need to reduce fatigue related accidents through the top ten most wanted list. Additionally, the International Civil Aviation Organization and Federal Aviation Administration have continuously promoted fatigue risk management. Most fatigue related research as well as safety standards in aviation involve air carrier and military operations. However, there has been a recent revival of fatigue related research in collegiate aviation. A recent study found that 85% of collegiate aviation pilots (n = 141) reported fatigue negatively impacted their flight training activities. Results of a qualitative study indicated poor knowledge and behaviors by Part 141 collegiate aviation students (n = 35) regarding quality and quantity of sleep, decision-making processes, and lifestyle choices.

The current research study examines the sleepiness and fatigue of collegiate aviation pilots using self-reported scales. The Karolinska Sleepiness and the Samn-Perelli Scales measure the level of sleepiness and fatigue states, respectively. Thirty students (n = 30) were asked to track their fatigue and sleepiness levels four times a day, once a week, for four months, during the 2019 Fall academic semester. Researchers expect to gain a clearer understanding of how time of the day, day of the week, and month effect sleepiness and fatigue levels during flight operations in a collegiate aviation environment. Understanding these factors may help provide better safety promotion efforts such as training and education, fatigue awareness, and fatigue risk management standards. Findings of this study and opportunities for future research will be discussed.