Title

Gender Differences in Factors Influencing Retention in Aviation Occupations

Presenter Email

kirkpak4@my.erau.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B - F

Start Date

3-2-2020 11:15 AM

End Date

3-2-2020 12:30 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Pilot Supply/ Flight Instructor Supply

Keywords

Gender, Female, Retention Rates, Aviation industry

Abstract

In the past 90 years, the workforce has been diversified in many fields yet diversity in the pilot workforce has remained stagnant. This also holds true for other aviation occupations (e.g., aviation maintenance, air traffic control). Promoting gender diversity is one approach to address the pilot shortage and ensure a strong aviation workforce in the future. This will involve opening aviation occupations to all members of society: leveraging the untapped potential in groups historically underrepresented in the industry. Women are a vast resource overlooked for far too long. Aviation companies need to target this group to fill the gap left by traditional male pilots when they retire and meet the ever-increasing demand for pilots and support personnel. Accordingly, the overall objective of this research project is to determine what factors contribute to female retention rate, as compared to males, in aviation occupations in the United States. A survey was created, drawing from the extant literature in organizational retention and diversity in aviation. The survey included Likert-scale questions on nine subjects related to career retention (job satisfaction, professional growth opportunities, challenging work, monetary and non-monetary benefits, work-life balance, management practices, sexual harassment/gender bias, and aviation passion) as well as demographic questions (age, gender, current profession, years in current profession, previous profession, and years in previous profession. Findings from this study can be applied to promote the recruitment and retention of females in the aviation domain and help solve the severe labor shortage affecting the entire aviation industry.

Presenter Biography

Katie Kirkpatrick is a Human Factors undergraduate student currently in her junior year. She works as a student researcher with Katya Rivera under the supervision of Dr. Cuevas, Assistant Professor in the College of Aviation School of Graduate Studies at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), Daytona Beach, FL. She also operates as a student editor in the Beyond: Undergraduate Research Journal. She spends her weekends preparing with the Riddle Players Theatre Company for their Spring performance.

View Katie Kirkpatrick’s Bio Page

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Mar 2nd, 11:15 AM Mar 2nd, 12:30 PM

Gender Differences in Factors Influencing Retention in Aviation Occupations

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B - F

In the past 90 years, the workforce has been diversified in many fields yet diversity in the pilot workforce has remained stagnant. This also holds true for other aviation occupations (e.g., aviation maintenance, air traffic control). Promoting gender diversity is one approach to address the pilot shortage and ensure a strong aviation workforce in the future. This will involve opening aviation occupations to all members of society: leveraging the untapped potential in groups historically underrepresented in the industry. Women are a vast resource overlooked for far too long. Aviation companies need to target this group to fill the gap left by traditional male pilots when they retire and meet the ever-increasing demand for pilots and support personnel. Accordingly, the overall objective of this research project is to determine what factors contribute to female retention rate, as compared to males, in aviation occupations in the United States. A survey was created, drawing from the extant literature in organizational retention and diversity in aviation. The survey included Likert-scale questions on nine subjects related to career retention (job satisfaction, professional growth opportunities, challenging work, monetary and non-monetary benefits, work-life balance, management practices, sexual harassment/gender bias, and aviation passion) as well as demographic questions (age, gender, current profession, years in current profession, previous profession, and years in previous profession. Findings from this study can be applied to promote the recruitment and retention of females in the aviation domain and help solve the severe labor shortage affecting the entire aviation industry.