Title

Pilot-Supply Sustainability—Standards, Outreach, and Mentoring

Presenter Email

paul.ryder@alpa.org

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B - F

Start Date

3-2-2020 11:15 AM

End Date

3-2-2020 12:30 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Pilot Supply/ Flight Instructor Supply

Keywords

supply, outreach, instructor

Abstract

Flight training organizations in North America are experiencing strong student interest in flight training and a career as a professional pilot. In addition, airlines have introduced successful recruitment and retention programs. Experience has shown that most staffing challenges are successfully resolved by improving the work/life balance, pay, and career-progression offerings.

In addition to strategies used to address pilot-supply, the entire pathway from student pilot to line-pilot should be viewed as an ecosystem. This ecosystem must maintain the resiliency and capacity to train and certify future generations of pilots and adapt to market needs and swings.

Industry must be cognizant of changes that may upset the equilibrium that exists today. Environmental factors, such as airspace, aircraft, mechanics, regulations, potential candidate pool, and others all play a role in helping the ecosystem of pilot production. The United States first officer qualification (FOQ) standards provide an effective structure within this ecosystem by maintaining a continuous stream of flight instructors to train the next generation of pilots.

A review of the ecosystem will show how the market has responded, data on ATP/R-ATP issuance rates, and the stabilizing effect that the FOQ has had. In addition, the importance of professional, practical, and academic development of pilots as they begin and progress in their careers, allowing us to remain the most robust and resilient system in the world will also be discussed.

Presenter Biography

As the resource coordinator at the Air Line Pilots Association Int’l (ALPA), First Officer Paul Ryder strategically aligns ALPA’s staff and resources to achieve the Association’s goals, namely to advance the piloting profession by executing initiatives pertaining to aviation safety, security, and pilot representation; and securing the future of the profession, by inspiring the next generation of airline pilots. He also works with ALPA’s Collective Bargaining Committee, other ALPA presidential committees, and MECs to advance the pilots’ agenda and ensure that pilot groups have no issues accessing ALPA resources.

Ryder also brings his subject matter expertise on the topic of pilot supply. He has spoken at a number of conferences around the world, including the National Aircraft Training Symposium, the World Aviation Training Conference, the International Women in Aviation Conference, the Global Pilots’ Symposium, the Royal Aeronautical Society's International Flight Crew Training Conference, the European Aviation Training Symposium, and the Department of Defense National Pilot Sourcing Forum.

Ryder participates in ALPA’s role on the international realm through the Int’l Federation of Air Line Pilots Associations as a member of the Human Performance (HUPER) committee and the UAS Working Group.

He’s also working on aviation workforce development initiatives through AviationWorks4U, a collective group of aviation industry stakeholders that have partnered with youth-based organizations to inspire the future generations into all aviation career pathways to ensure the availability of these rewarding careers for generations to come.

Ryder, A B737 pilot for United Airlines, previously served as an EMB-145 captain for ExpressJet Airlines. He’s held several union positions, including outreach on ALPA’s Education Committee. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves for six years and lives in Florida with his wife and fellow pilot, Kate, and two young sons, Alex and Matthew.

View Paul Ryder’s Bio Page

Share

COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 11:15 AM Mar 2nd, 12:30 PM

Pilot-Supply Sustainability—Standards, Outreach, and Mentoring

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B - F

Flight training organizations in North America are experiencing strong student interest in flight training and a career as a professional pilot. In addition, airlines have introduced successful recruitment and retention programs. Experience has shown that most staffing challenges are successfully resolved by improving the work/life balance, pay, and career-progression offerings.

In addition to strategies used to address pilot-supply, the entire pathway from student pilot to line-pilot should be viewed as an ecosystem. This ecosystem must maintain the resiliency and capacity to train and certify future generations of pilots and adapt to market needs and swings.

Industry must be cognizant of changes that may upset the equilibrium that exists today. Environmental factors, such as airspace, aircraft, mechanics, regulations, potential candidate pool, and others all play a role in helping the ecosystem of pilot production. The United States first officer qualification (FOQ) standards provide an effective structure within this ecosystem by maintaining a continuous stream of flight instructors to train the next generation of pilots.

A review of the ecosystem will show how the market has responded, data on ATP/R-ATP issuance rates, and the stabilizing effect that the FOQ has had. In addition, the importance of professional, practical, and academic development of pilots as they begin and progress in their careers, allowing us to remain the most robust and resilient system in the world will also be discussed.