Title

Recommended Training Practices to Prepare Pilots to Cope with Information Conflicts

Presenter Email

mcarroll@fit.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

Start Date

3-3-2020 9:30 AM

End Date

3-3-2020 10:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

NextGen - What's been done and what lies ahead

Keywords

Aviation, Training, Decision Making, Information Conflicts

Abstract

As the next generation of flight deck information systems are being utilized on the flight deck, pilots now have greater amounts of information at their fingertips. Information that was typically available only from certified information sources in aircraft panels, is now being provided by a range of sources, both within the panel and on Electronic Flight Bags (EFBs). Although redundant sources of information provide pilots a means by which to crosscheck and hone in on ground truth, they also introduce the potential for pilots encountering conflicting information. As conflicting information can have negative effects on decision making, there is a need to ensure pilots are trained to effectively evaluate, integrate and make decisions based on information from redundant, and potentially conflicting information. Based on findings from the literature, we present several best practice guidelines for preparing pilots to effectively respond to situations in which they will be faced with redundant and potentially conflicting information. Based on data collected during a questionnaire study administered to a large sample of airline, corporate and general aviation pilots, and a simulation-based study with B737 airline pilots, we operationalize these guidelines into specific training recommendations for the pilot training community and provide use case examples of how these recommendations would be implemented in both commercial and general aviation contexts.

Presenter Biography

Dr. Meredith Carroll is an Associate Professor of Aviation Human Factors at Florida Institute of Technology’s College of Aeronautics. She has over 15 years of experience, both in industry and academia, studying human performance, human-computer interaction and learning in complex systems within commercial aviation, military and space applications. She received her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Virginia, her Masters in Aviation Science from Florida Institute of Technology and her Ph.D. in Applied Experimental Psychology and Human Factors from the University of Central Florida.

View Meredith Carroll’s Bio Page

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Mar 3rd, 9:30 AM Mar 3rd, 10:45 AM

Recommended Training Practices to Prepare Pilots to Cope with Information Conflicts

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

As the next generation of flight deck information systems are being utilized on the flight deck, pilots now have greater amounts of information at their fingertips. Information that was typically available only from certified information sources in aircraft panels, is now being provided by a range of sources, both within the panel and on Electronic Flight Bags (EFBs). Although redundant sources of information provide pilots a means by which to crosscheck and hone in on ground truth, they also introduce the potential for pilots encountering conflicting information. As conflicting information can have negative effects on decision making, there is a need to ensure pilots are trained to effectively evaluate, integrate and make decisions based on information from redundant, and potentially conflicting information. Based on findings from the literature, we present several best practice guidelines for preparing pilots to effectively respond to situations in which they will be faced with redundant and potentially conflicting information. Based on data collected during a questionnaire study administered to a large sample of airline, corporate and general aviation pilots, and a simulation-based study with B737 airline pilots, we operationalize these guidelines into specific training recommendations for the pilot training community and provide use case examples of how these recommendations would be implemented in both commercial and general aviation contexts.