Title

Prevalence of Invulnerability in Collegiate Part 141 Flight Students

Presenter Email

anakushian2016@my.fit.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

Start Date

3-3-2020 10:45 AM

End Date

3-3-2020 12:00 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Flight Training

Keywords

hazardous attitudes, collegiate pilots, invulnerability

Abstract

Nearly every flight training program focuses on promoting good habits for aeronautical decision making. Some of the factors that influence aeronautical decision making are hazardous attitudes. The five hazardous attitudes are thought patterns that put pilots at risk of being involved in an accident. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of one hazardous attitude, invulnerability, in Collegiate Part 141 flight students. Participants were recruited from a collegiate flight program at a university in Florida. Invulnerability is particularly important to study because a pilot thinking that he/she is immune from being in an accident could lead to a dangerous situation. The authors find this particular attitude important to study in college students because that segment of the population is still undergoing brain development. The study employed an ex-post facto design where participants were administered a 30-question survey consisting of Hunter's (2005)’s New Hazardous Attitudes Scale. The study was administered to students during their private, instrument, commercial, and flight instructor ground school courses respectively. The findings of this study will help determine how changes in knowledge level affected students’ levels of invulnerability. Data collection is ongoing, and the results will be ready by early December. The study’s data will be analyzed via a between-subjects one-way ANOVA.

Presenter Biography

Andrew Nakushian is a senior at the Florida Institute of Technology studying Human Factors and Safety. His areas of interest include general aviation safety and human performance in extreme environments. He is an avid general aviation pilot which sparks his interest in general aviation safety.

View Andrew Nakushian’s Bio Page

View Aayush Kapar’s Bio Page

View Kenley Ryan’s Bio Page

View Rian Mehta’s Bio Page

View Brooke Wheeler’s Bio Page

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Mar 3rd, 10:45 AM Mar 3rd, 12:00 PM

Prevalence of Invulnerability in Collegiate Part 141 Flight Students

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

Nearly every flight training program focuses on promoting good habits for aeronautical decision making. Some of the factors that influence aeronautical decision making are hazardous attitudes. The five hazardous attitudes are thought patterns that put pilots at risk of being involved in an accident. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of one hazardous attitude, invulnerability, in Collegiate Part 141 flight students. Participants were recruited from a collegiate flight program at a university in Florida. Invulnerability is particularly important to study because a pilot thinking that he/she is immune from being in an accident could lead to a dangerous situation. The authors find this particular attitude important to study in college students because that segment of the population is still undergoing brain development. The study employed an ex-post facto design where participants were administered a 30-question survey consisting of Hunter's (2005)’s New Hazardous Attitudes Scale. The study was administered to students during their private, instrument, commercial, and flight instructor ground school courses respectively. The findings of this study will help determine how changes in knowledge level affected students’ levels of invulnerability. Data collection is ongoing, and the results will be ready by early December. The study’s data will be analyzed via a between-subjects one-way ANOVA.