Title

Student Pilot Perceptions of Flight Training

Presenter Email

bishopr33@gmail.com

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Start Date

3-2-2020 8:00 AM

End Date

3-2-2020 9:30 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Ab initio flight training

Other Topic Area

Technologically Advanced Cockpits (Glass Cockpits)

Keywords

Aviation, flight, training, mental workload

Abstract

Within the aviation industry, there is an increasing demand for an estimated 635,000 new pilots over the next 20 years (Boeing, 2018). The demand for training of new, student pilots has increased the use of recreational aircraft (RA) with technologically advanced cockpits in flight schools. The impact of RA based training compared to general aviation (GA) aircraft training on student mental workload is not well understood. This research investigated student pilot awareness of mental workload between technologically advanced cockpit equipped RA training with analog gauge equipped general aviation aircraft (GA) training.

There were a total of 25 aviation students, with a mean age of 24.4 years (17 males and 8 females), who completed in separate studies, self-reported assessment of mental workload using the NASA TLX combined with semi-structured interviews following both RA and GA flight training circuits, and simulation-based flight circuits. The results showed a significantly higher rating of mental workload across subscales of mental and physical demand on the NASATLX in recreational aviation aircraft training compared to general aviation aircraft. Similarly, thematic content analysis of semi-structured interviews identified that mental workload of the student pilots flying the recreational aircraft was perceived to be more than the general aviation aircraft, with pilots reporting that Landing, as a stage of flight, to be the most mentally demanding phase of flight for both RA and GA aircraft.

This research highlights an opportunity for further research into specific training for RA vs. GA aircraft training and provides an insight into the overall demand and potential barriers of using technology-based cockpits in the developmental stages of flight training. Further research is recommended to measure the physiological levels of mental workload during a flight to assess the real time effects of mental workload required of student pilots.

Comments

Presented during Concurrent Session 1A: Flight Training

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Mar 2nd, 8:00 AM Mar 2nd, 9:30 AM

Student Pilot Perceptions of Flight Training

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Within the aviation industry, there is an increasing demand for an estimated 635,000 new pilots over the next 20 years (Boeing, 2018). The demand for training of new, student pilots has increased the use of recreational aircraft (RA) with technologically advanced cockpits in flight schools. The impact of RA based training compared to general aviation (GA) aircraft training on student mental workload is not well understood. This research investigated student pilot awareness of mental workload between technologically advanced cockpit equipped RA training with analog gauge equipped general aviation aircraft (GA) training.

There were a total of 25 aviation students, with a mean age of 24.4 years (17 males and 8 females), who completed in separate studies, self-reported assessment of mental workload using the NASA TLX combined with semi-structured interviews following both RA and GA flight training circuits, and simulation-based flight circuits. The results showed a significantly higher rating of mental workload across subscales of mental and physical demand on the NASATLX in recreational aviation aircraft training compared to general aviation aircraft. Similarly, thematic content analysis of semi-structured interviews identified that mental workload of the student pilots flying the recreational aircraft was perceived to be more than the general aviation aircraft, with pilots reporting that Landing, as a stage of flight, to be the most mentally demanding phase of flight for both RA and GA aircraft.

This research highlights an opportunity for further research into specific training for RA vs. GA aircraft training and provides an insight into the overall demand and potential barriers of using technology-based cockpits in the developmental stages of flight training. Further research is recommended to measure the physiological levels of mental workload during a flight to assess the real time effects of mental workload required of student pilots.