Title

Integrating the 1st Person View and the 3rd Person View Using a Connected VR-MR System for Pilot Training

Presenter Email

coh1@kent.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Start Date

3-3-2020 1:15 PM

End Date

3-3-2020 2:15 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Flight Training; Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality/Mixed Reality in Aviation Training

Keywords

virtual reality, mixed reality, flight simulation, training system

Abstract

Many virtual reality (VR)-based flight simulation programs provide pilots the enhanced reality from the 1st person-view to make themselves immersed in the cockpit. Using the VR simulations, pilots can take flight training in many challenging situations that are hard to create in real environments due to its natural entropy and safety concerns such as severe crosswind or engine fire. Mixed reality (MR) technology provides three-dimensional graphics so that users can effectively see all 360 degree-vertical and horizontal aspects of an object while they freely move around to see the graphics maintaining the consciousness of real space. Flight instructors may want to monitor the progress of an airplane itself above many regions from the 3rd person view as well as how the airplane’s pilot follows the desired flight procedures in the cockpit from the 1st person view. The investigators developed the prototype of a comprehensive pilot training system by connecting VR and MR that make both views available to evaluate a pilot’s flight performance from various aspects. Five flight instructors provided their feedbacks after trying the prototype system. They revealed that the prototype would provide a fast and accurate evaluation of pilot performance for novice pilots and insights to develop more economic and safer flight paths in a certain region. The function of evaluating two different perspectives for a single flight operation at the same time will provide an unprecedented advantage to the conventional training and monitoring environments that have been separated or the 2D base.

Presenter Biography

Chang-Geun Oh, Ph.D. joined Kent State in 2016 and has been conducting aviation human factors research and teaching human factors and physiology both in undergraduate and graduate levels. He received a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Deajin University in 1996, a master's degree in Software Engineering from Korea University in 2006, and another master's degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech in 2010. He earned a Ph.D. in Industrial and Human Systems from Wright State University in 2015.

His primary research areas are applying VR/AR technologies for flight training, aircraft cockpit display design, ATC display design, evaluation of aircraft pilot performance/air traffic controller performance, and human machine interface. He is the director of Human Centered Aviation Systems (HuCAS) Lab in Kent State University.

View Chang-Geun Oh’s Bio Page

Share

COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 1:15 PM Mar 3rd, 2:15 PM

Integrating the 1st Person View and the 3rd Person View Using a Connected VR-MR System for Pilot Training

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Many virtual reality (VR)-based flight simulation programs provide pilots the enhanced reality from the 1st person-view to make themselves immersed in the cockpit. Using the VR simulations, pilots can take flight training in many challenging situations that are hard to create in real environments due to its natural entropy and safety concerns such as severe crosswind or engine fire. Mixed reality (MR) technology provides three-dimensional graphics so that users can effectively see all 360 degree-vertical and horizontal aspects of an object while they freely move around to see the graphics maintaining the consciousness of real space. Flight instructors may want to monitor the progress of an airplane itself above many regions from the 3rd person view as well as how the airplane’s pilot follows the desired flight procedures in the cockpit from the 1st person view. The investigators developed the prototype of a comprehensive pilot training system by connecting VR and MR that make both views available to evaluate a pilot’s flight performance from various aspects. Five flight instructors provided their feedbacks after trying the prototype system. They revealed that the prototype would provide a fast and accurate evaluation of pilot performance for novice pilots and insights to develop more economic and safer flight paths in a certain region. The function of evaluating two different perspectives for a single flight operation at the same time will provide an unprecedented advantage to the conventional training and monitoring environments that have been separated or the 2D base.