Title

Examination of the Impact of Various Training Approaches on Different UAS Operator Populations

Presenter Email

slindsey2013@my.fit.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

Start Date

3-3-2020 1:15 PM

End Date

3-3-2020 2:15 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

UAS; Training; Implications for pilots; UAS; UAS; UAS; Training; Implications for pilots

Keywords

UAS training, engagement, operators, commercial UAS, recreational UAS

Abstract

In recent years, the UAS industry has extended beyond military and recreational use and is now positioned to become a major portion of the aviation industry. As we move toward UAS integration into the national airspace system, UAS operators need effective training to ensure safe operation. Training UAS operators in an engaging way is important to ensure the best performance and transfer of training. Training methods that elicit high levels of learner engagement have been shown to improve knowledge gains, performance, and therefore such training techniques provide an opportunity for improving UAS training effectiveness and transfer. The growth of the UAS industry across various domains such as first responders and industrial inspectors has resulted in a broad demographic of end users. Given this, training may need to be tailored based on the population to ensure an engaging experience. To examine this topic, a study was conducted in which UAS pilots from the student population and first responder population participated in UAS training to test the effect of different training approaches on learner engagement of different end user populations. Participants engaged in instructional videos, simulation challenges, and live obstacle courses and were measured on their engagement levels and performance. This presentation will describe the methods and findings associated with the study along with implications for the aviation industry.

Presenter Biography

Summer Rebensky received her B.A. in Psychology, an M.S. in Aviation Human Factors, and is currently an Aviation Sciences PhD candidate at the Florida Institute of Technology. She has five years’ experience in studying interfaces, training, and team research. In addition, she has experience in developing research environments for aviation simulations, team simulations, and virtual environments. Her research focuses on training and usability in modern and augmented/virtual environments and UAS operations.

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Mar 3rd, 1:15 PM Mar 3rd, 2:15 PM

Examination of the Impact of Various Training Approaches on Different UAS Operator Populations

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 E/F

In recent years, the UAS industry has extended beyond military and recreational use and is now positioned to become a major portion of the aviation industry. As we move toward UAS integration into the national airspace system, UAS operators need effective training to ensure safe operation. Training UAS operators in an engaging way is important to ensure the best performance and transfer of training. Training methods that elicit high levels of learner engagement have been shown to improve knowledge gains, performance, and therefore such training techniques provide an opportunity for improving UAS training effectiveness and transfer. The growth of the UAS industry across various domains such as first responders and industrial inspectors has resulted in a broad demographic of end users. Given this, training may need to be tailored based on the population to ensure an engaging experience. To examine this topic, a study was conducted in which UAS pilots from the student population and first responder population participated in UAS training to test the effect of different training approaches on learner engagement of different end user populations. Participants engaged in instructional videos, simulation challenges, and live obstacle courses and were measured on their engagement levels and performance. This presentation will describe the methods and findings associated with the study along with implications for the aviation industry.