Title

Integrating Aviation Technology, Emergency Services, and Human Resilience: Considerations from Social Scientists

Presenter Email

lenoblec@erau.edu

Location

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Start Date

3-3-2020 2:15 PM

End Date

3-3-2020 3:30 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

UAS; Training; NextGen - What's been done and what lies ahead; Professionalism/Leadership; Incorporating Human Factors; UAS; Human factors integration; Incorporating Human Factors; UAS; UAS; Training

Keywords

UAS, disaster management, human security, resilience

Abstract

Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have a range of applications within the field of disaster response. This presentation offers a novel framework of psychosocial considerations designed to advance UAS and disaster management integration. Social scientists highlight important challenges to the effective integration of three primary entities: UAS, the team of teams that responds to disasters, and populations affected by disasters.

The presentation adopts an emerging theoretical perspective on the intersection between UAS capabilities and disaster phases and extends it by bringing necessary attention to social science issues. Specifically, the framework outlines psychosocial considerations and areas of improvement for preparation (training), response (incident command), and recovery (occupational health; population resilience) phases of disaster management.

First, training curricula must involve the full disaster response multiteam system (MTS; i.e., team of teams) in cross-training that builds a shared identity by operationalizing UAS as a component team. Second, disaster response MTSs must establish incident command structures that incorporate UAS into team communication and coordination networks. Third, the implications of stressors unique to UAS operation need to be better understood in the context of existing cyclical effects of work stress on disaster responder performance and well-being. Finally, as crisis communication affects disaster-impacted communities, populations must be able to leverage UAS as a mechanism for, and not a barrier against, recovery from disaster.

Across the globe, disasters threaten human security. This presentation provides a necessary interdisciplinary perspective on implementing UAS in disaster management to help the world better prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate disasters.

Presenter Biography

Dr. Chelsea A. LeNoble is an assistant professor of Industrial/Organizational Psychology in the department of Applied Sciences at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Worldwide. Her research program focuses on the individual, team-level, and organizational factors related to employee engagement, resilience, and recovery from work stress. Part of a new faculty cluster in the area of human resilience and emergency services, Dr. LeNoble works with communications and emergency management scholars to support high-stress occupations such as healthcare workers and first responders. Dr. LeNoble earned her Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Florida Institute of Technology. After graduating, she completed a 2.5-year postdoctoral fellowship at Clemson University and Prisma Health in Greenville, SC. As an embedded scholar within the health system, she led interdisciplinary research projects on burnout and resilience, employee well-being and engagement, and leadership and team development.

View Chelsea LeNoble’s Bio Page

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Mar 3rd, 2:15 PM Mar 3rd, 3:30 PM

Integrating Aviation Technology, Emergency Services, and Human Resilience: Considerations from Social Scientists

Mori Hosseini Student Union Events Center (Bldg #610) – Rooms 165 B/C

Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have a range of applications within the field of disaster response. This presentation offers a novel framework of psychosocial considerations designed to advance UAS and disaster management integration. Social scientists highlight important challenges to the effective integration of three primary entities: UAS, the team of teams that responds to disasters, and populations affected by disasters.

The presentation adopts an emerging theoretical perspective on the intersection between UAS capabilities and disaster phases and extends it by bringing necessary attention to social science issues. Specifically, the framework outlines psychosocial considerations and areas of improvement for preparation (training), response (incident command), and recovery (occupational health; population resilience) phases of disaster management.

First, training curricula must involve the full disaster response multiteam system (MTS; i.e., team of teams) in cross-training that builds a shared identity by operationalizing UAS as a component team. Second, disaster response MTSs must establish incident command structures that incorporate UAS into team communication and coordination networks. Third, the implications of stressors unique to UAS operation need to be better understood in the context of existing cyclical effects of work stress on disaster responder performance and well-being. Finally, as crisis communication affects disaster-impacted communities, populations must be able to leverage UAS as a mechanism for, and not a barrier against, recovery from disaster.

Across the globe, disasters threaten human security. This presentation provides a necessary interdisciplinary perspective on implementing UAS in disaster management to help the world better prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate disasters.