Presenter Email

vsharma2016@my.fit.edu

Submission Type

Abstract - Paper/Presentation Only

Topic Area

Flight Training; Aviation Safety

Other Topic Area

CFIs Safety Behaviors at Flight Training Schools

Keywords

CFIs, Personality Traits, Self-efficacy, Risk Perception, Safety Climate, and Safety Behaviors

Abstract

According to Aircraft Owners Pilot Association [2], approximately 63% of the accidents involving certified flight instructors (CFIs) occurred during advanced training, which involves low altitude operations, critical decision-making skills, and accurate judgement. Research in the past has demonstrated that pilots’ safety behaviors also predict their involvement in an accident or incident [6]. Many studies across various work domains have examined how factors such as personality traits, perceived risk, safety climate, and self-efficacy influence safety behaviors [1][3][4][5][6][7][8]. Studies have found that personality traits such as Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Openness, and Agreeableness were positively related to safety behaviors [3][7][11], whereas Neuroticism was negatively related to safety behaviors [3]. Past research has also shown that factors such as Self-efficacy, risk perception, and safety climate were positively related to safety behaviors [1][4][5][6]. Some studies have found that factors such as risk perception and self-efficacy either mediated or moderated the relationship between personality traits and safety behaviors [10][13]. Other studies have found that safety climate moderated the relationship between personality traits and safety behaviors [9][12]. This presentation will put forth a hypothetical model of how these factors influence safety behaviors, including the direct and indirect relationships between personality traits, self-efficacy, risk perception, safety climate, and safety behaviors of CFIs. Their implications for flight schools will also be discussed.

Comments

Presented in Session 3 B - Research in Flight Training

References

[1] Adjekum, D. K. (2017). An evaluation of the relationships between collegiate aviation safety management system initiative, self-efficacy, transformational safety leadership and safety behavior mediated by safety motivation. International Journal of Aviation, Aeronautics, and Aerospace, 4(2), 4.

[2] Aircraft Owners Pilot Association - Air Safety Institute. (2015). Fatal Flight Training Accident Report.

[3] Beus, J. M., Dhanani, L. Y., & McCord, M. A. (2015). A meta-analysis of personality and workplace safety: Addressing unanswered questions. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(2), 481.

[4] Chen, C. F., & Chen, S. C. (2014). Measuring the effects of Safety Management System practices, morality leadership and self-efficacy on pilots’ safety behaviors: Safety motivation as a mediator. Safety Science, 62, 376–385.

[5] He, C., McCabe, B., Jia, G., & Sun, J. (2020). Effects of safety climate and safety behavior on safety outcomes between supervisors and construction workers. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 146(1), 04019092.

[6] Hunter, D. R. (2006). Risk perception among general aviation pilots. The International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 16(2), 135–144.

[7] Jong-Hyun, L., Soo-Hyun, S., Seung-Nam, M., & Kyung-Sun, L. (2018). The effects of personality types on self-reported safety behavior: Focused on plant workers in Korea. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 121, 20–27.

[8] Ji, M., You, X., Lan, J., & Yang, S. (2011). The impact of risk tolerance, risk perception and hazardous attitude on safety operation among airline pilots in China. Safety science, 49(10), 1412–1420.

[9] Lee, S., & Dalal, R. S. (2016). Climate as situational strength: Safety climate strength as a cross-level moderator of the relationship between conscientiousness and safety behaviour. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 25(1), 120–132.

[10] Machin, M. A., & Sankey, K. S. (2008). Relationships between young drivers’ personality characteristics, risk perceptions, and driving behaviour. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 40(2), 541–547.

[11] Parr, M. N., Ross, L. A., McManus, B., Bishop, H. J., Wittig, S. M., & Stavrinos, D. (2016). Differential impact of personality traits on distracted driving behaviors in teens and older adults. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 92, 107–112.

[12] Rajabi, F., Mokarami, H., Cousins, R., & Jahangiri, M. (2020). Structural equation modeling of safety performance based on personality traits, job and organizational-related factors. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 1–15.

[13] Zhang, Y., Huang, Y., Wang, Y., & Casey, T. W. (2020). Who uses a mobile phone while driving for food delivery? The role of personality, risk perception, and driving self-efficacy. Journal of Safety Research, 73, 69–80.

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CFIs’ Safety Behaviors at Flight Training Schools: Understanding the Effects of Personality Traits, Self-Efficacy, Risk Perception, and Safety Climate

According to Aircraft Owners Pilot Association [2], approximately 63% of the accidents involving certified flight instructors (CFIs) occurred during advanced training, which involves low altitude operations, critical decision-making skills, and accurate judgement. Research in the past has demonstrated that pilots’ safety behaviors also predict their involvement in an accident or incident [6]. Many studies across various work domains have examined how factors such as personality traits, perceived risk, safety climate, and self-efficacy influence safety behaviors [1][3][4][5][6][7][8]. Studies have found that personality traits such as Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Openness, and Agreeableness were positively related to safety behaviors [3][7][11], whereas Neuroticism was negatively related to safety behaviors [3]. Past research has also shown that factors such as Self-efficacy, risk perception, and safety climate were positively related to safety behaviors [1][4][5][6]. Some studies have found that factors such as risk perception and self-efficacy either mediated or moderated the relationship between personality traits and safety behaviors [10][13]. Other studies have found that safety climate moderated the relationship between personality traits and safety behaviors [9][12]. This presentation will put forth a hypothetical model of how these factors influence safety behaviors, including the direct and indirect relationships between personality traits, self-efficacy, risk perception, safety climate, and safety behaviors of CFIs. Their implications for flight schools will also be discussed.

 

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