Paper Title

Human Factors Considerations for Space Traffic Displays in the Cockpit

Start Date

13-11-2015 1:45 PM

Abstract

The commercial spaceflight era is ushering in a number of suborbital and orbital space vehicles that exceed the standard vertical dimensions (i.e., between 0 and 60,000 ft.) of the current air traffic management system. New systems are thus needed to adequately manage space traffic. Cockpit instrumentation (e.g., ADS-B, CPDLC) will be an important determinant in the design of the two-way communication between the spaceflight crew and space traffic controllers.

In some respects, the cockpit displays of these space vehicles will reflect those of today’s jetliners; however, other instrumentation specific to their unique flight profiles and mission requirements will need to be integrated. While some of these instruments will be required during all phases of flight, others will only be required at specific phases. In consideration of the limited physical space available on the instrument panel, implementation of both adaptable and adaptive display automation will be addressed. Primary instruments of concern include, but are not limited to, navigation, traffic separation, communication, and weather. This paper will utilize human factors principles to create a roadmap for designing the instrument panel to support the crew in terms of traffic management, safety, and mission assurance.

Keywords: Human factors, traffic displays, cockpit design, space traffic management

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Nov 13th, 1:45 PM

Human Factors Considerations for Space Traffic Displays in the Cockpit

The commercial spaceflight era is ushering in a number of suborbital and orbital space vehicles that exceed the standard vertical dimensions (i.e., between 0 and 60,000 ft.) of the current air traffic management system. New systems are thus needed to adequately manage space traffic. Cockpit instrumentation (e.g., ADS-B, CPDLC) will be an important determinant in the design of the two-way communication between the spaceflight crew and space traffic controllers.

In some respects, the cockpit displays of these space vehicles will reflect those of today’s jetliners; however, other instrumentation specific to their unique flight profiles and mission requirements will need to be integrated. While some of these instruments will be required during all phases of flight, others will only be required at specific phases. In consideration of the limited physical space available on the instrument panel, implementation of both adaptable and adaptive display automation will be addressed. Primary instruments of concern include, but are not limited to, navigation, traffic separation, communication, and weather. This paper will utilize human factors principles to create a roadmap for designing the instrument panel to support the crew in terms of traffic management, safety, and mission assurance.

Keywords: Human factors, traffic displays, cockpit design, space traffic management