Presentation Title

A Microcosm of Sustainable Practices: Honors Program and Project Haiti Partnership with Derbyshire Community Garden

Campus

Daytona Beach

Status

Faculty

Faculty/Staff Department

Honors

Student Year and Major

Marcy Smith (junior); Grace Robertson (senior)

Vendor Company

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Start Date

12-4-2022 11:00 AM

Presentation Type

Long presentation (faculty/staff) 15-20 minutes

Presentation Description/Abstract

The Embry-Riddle Honors Program has been partnering with and growing the Derbyshire Community Garden consistently/perpetually for the past two years, playing an increasingly managerial role. We emphasize regenerative practices, from planting a wide variety of heirloom organic seeds; to vermicomposting; to fully avoiding any chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides; to operating a Saturday produce market on site, supporting local residents in this food-insecure neighborhood with fresh, organic, nutrient-rich foods. Partnering with ERAU’s Project Haiti, the Haiti team has diverted some of its Ford Campus Community Challenge grant award (due to the team’s inability to travel to Haiti, chiefly due to social/political instability) to install an 18 panel ground-mounted solar array inside the Garden space, providing all of the power needed for Garden operation…plus reducing the electrical grid reliance of the adjoining Derbyshire Community Center by an estimated 25% monthly. We are moving closer to “closed loop system,” overall.

This involvement and partnership highlights the following:

  • Localized, high-caliber, individualized food production versus full reliance on long, complex (and vulnerable) supply chains
  • Regenerative, organic agricultural practices versus “Green Revolution” industrialized, chemical-intensive agriculture
  • Biodiversity and seed-saving/sharing versus the narrowing range of seed made available via large-scale, industrial agriculture/monoculture
  • Attention to building healthy soil as a key to overall health, versus the extractive practices commonly in place
  • Clean, sustainable sources of energy and the link between solar and agriculture (agrivoltaics)
  • Re/invigorating community connections across generational, gender, racial, national, and economic “boundaries”

Combined, these now-established features at Derbyshire open many further opportunities for on-site education regarding localized management and control, environmental stewardship, community impact and engagement, and environmental and human health.

Keywords

food insecurity; organic agriculture; heirloom seeds; vermicompost; agrivoltaics; community development; community impact

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM

A Microcosm of Sustainable Practices: Honors Program and Project Haiti Partnership with Derbyshire Community Garden

The Embry-Riddle Honors Program has been partnering with and growing the Derbyshire Community Garden consistently/perpetually for the past two years, playing an increasingly managerial role. We emphasize regenerative practices, from planting a wide variety of heirloom organic seeds; to vermicomposting; to fully avoiding any chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides; to operating a Saturday produce market on site, supporting local residents in this food-insecure neighborhood with fresh, organic, nutrient-rich foods. Partnering with ERAU’s Project Haiti, the Haiti team has diverted some of its Ford Campus Community Challenge grant award (due to the team’s inability to travel to Haiti, chiefly due to social/political instability) to install an 18 panel ground-mounted solar array inside the Garden space, providing all of the power needed for Garden operation…plus reducing the electrical grid reliance of the adjoining Derbyshire Community Center by an estimated 25% monthly. We are moving closer to “closed loop system,” overall.

This involvement and partnership highlights the following:

  • Localized, high-caliber, individualized food production versus full reliance on long, complex (and vulnerable) supply chains
  • Regenerative, organic agricultural practices versus “Green Revolution” industrialized, chemical-intensive agriculture
  • Biodiversity and seed-saving/sharing versus the narrowing range of seed made available via large-scale, industrial agriculture/monoculture
  • Attention to building healthy soil as a key to overall health, versus the extractive practices commonly in place
  • Clean, sustainable sources of energy and the link between solar and agriculture (agrivoltaics)
  • Re/invigorating community connections across generational, gender, racial, national, and economic “boundaries”

Combined, these now-established features at Derbyshire open many further opportunities for on-site education regarding localized management and control, environmental stewardship, community impact and engagement, and environmental and human health.