Presentation Title

Revolutionizing ERAU Through Sustainable Engineering

Presenter Information

Gianna CastanoFollow

Campus

Daytona Beach

Status

Student

Faculty/Staff Department

Human Factors and Behavioral Neurobiology

Student Year and Major

Human Factors Psychology Senior

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Presentation Description/Abstract

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is dangerously behind the curve of transitioning to a resourceful and sustainable campus. Approximately 640 pounds of trash is generated by a single college student each year (Planet Aid, 2015), including plastics not repurposed or recycled due to contamination by items that are not recyclable (i.e., trash, food). In an effort to phase out single-use plastics on campus, this project seeks to transition all 3D printers on campus to utilize recycled 3D filament made from various plastics rather than use filament made from new materials. Interest in this effort was measured via an attitude survey released with 82.8% of students saying they are interested in having free access to 3D printers and 85.1% claiming they are advocates for recycling practices on campus. Utilizing a SPARK Equipment Grant award, the goal of this effort is to develop a plan for a new 3D printing service in a dedicated makerspace for ERAU students using recycled 3D filament. A research plan investigating the durability and compatibility of recycled filament in campus 3D printers and comparing its characteristics against new, standard filament will be revealed. The intended benefits of this project for Embry-Riddle include the gradual elimination of virgin plastic use for 3D modeling, a movement towards a zero-waste policy, and attraction of prospective students interested in sustainable engineering.

Keywords

recycling, 3D printing, engineering, sustainability, single-use plastic, filament

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Revolutionizing ERAU Through Sustainable Engineering

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is dangerously behind the curve of transitioning to a resourceful and sustainable campus. Approximately 640 pounds of trash is generated by a single college student each year (Planet Aid, 2015), including plastics not repurposed or recycled due to contamination by items that are not recyclable (i.e., trash, food). In an effort to phase out single-use plastics on campus, this project seeks to transition all 3D printers on campus to utilize recycled 3D filament made from various plastics rather than use filament made from new materials. Interest in this effort was measured via an attitude survey released with 82.8% of students saying they are interested in having free access to 3D printers and 85.1% claiming they are advocates for recycling practices on campus. Utilizing a SPARK Equipment Grant award, the goal of this effort is to develop a plan for a new 3D printing service in a dedicated makerspace for ERAU students using recycled 3D filament. A research plan investigating the durability and compatibility of recycled filament in campus 3D printers and comparing its characteristics against new, standard filament will be revealed. The intended benefits of this project for Embry-Riddle include the gradual elimination of virgin plastic use for 3D modeling, a movement towards a zero-waste policy, and attraction of prospective students interested in sustainable engineering.