Abstract Title

Detecting and Imaging Orbital Debris

Authors' Class Standing

Jared Cokley, Junior Blake Williams, Senior

Lead Presenter's Name

Jared Cokley

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Bogdan Udrea

Abstract

DETECTING AND IMAGING ORBITAL DEBRIS

Jared Cokley1, Blake Williams2

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Project ARAPAIMA

Daytona Beach, FL, U.S.A.

This project promotes Application for Automated Proximity Analysis and Imaging’s (ARAPAIMA) nanosatellite’s capability of effectively obtaining reliable data from orbital debris of interest while in space. Three-dimensional, visual spectrum and infrared imaging of space debris will quickly and accurately characterize the shape and tumbling rate from a close proximity relative orbit. The importance of space debris awareness is referenced from one of NASA’s chief scientists Nicholas Johnson, as “the greatest risk to space missions comes from non-trackable debris.” The need for this information from the Department of Defense and other various agencies enters ARAPAIMA in to a launch slot between 2015 and 2017 through NASA's Educational Launch Initiative (CSELI).

By assimilating the extensive work of its multi-subsystem teams, ARAPAIMA’s goal will broadcast and classify specific known properties of orbiting space debris after completing the University Nanosat Program’s (UNP) four phase process.

Location

Center for Faith & Spirituality

Start Date

9-4-2014 1:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Detecting and Imaging Orbital Debris

Center for Faith & Spirituality

DETECTING AND IMAGING ORBITAL DEBRIS

Jared Cokley1, Blake Williams2

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Project ARAPAIMA

Daytona Beach, FL, U.S.A.

This project promotes Application for Automated Proximity Analysis and Imaging’s (ARAPAIMA) nanosatellite’s capability of effectively obtaining reliable data from orbital debris of interest while in space. Three-dimensional, visual spectrum and infrared imaging of space debris will quickly and accurately characterize the shape and tumbling rate from a close proximity relative orbit. The importance of space debris awareness is referenced from one of NASA’s chief scientists Nicholas Johnson, as “the greatest risk to space missions comes from non-trackable debris.” The need for this information from the Department of Defense and other various agencies enters ARAPAIMA in to a launch slot between 2015 and 2017 through NASA's Educational Launch Initiative (CSELI).

By assimilating the extensive work of its multi-subsystem teams, ARAPAIMA’s goal will broadcast and classify specific known properties of orbiting space debris after completing the University Nanosat Program’s (UNP) four phase process.