group

Authors' Class Standing

Tianyuan Zhao, Senior; Jasfer Aniban, Senior; Adedolapo Awofiranye, Senior; Jeremiah Dala, Sophomore.

Lead Presenter's Name

Tianyuan Zhao

Faculty Mentor Name

Dae Won Kim

Abstract

The main objective of this project is to build and test a rapid robotic fish with its propulsion system based on smart material actuators, such as Macro Fiber Composites (MFC) and Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMC). These state-of-the-art actuators based on active materials offer several potential advantages for robotic fish applications compared to traditional servo motors. One important benefit is that smart actuators are lightweight and can be embedded directly into the structure of a fish torso or control surface. In addition, they are eco-friendly and are completely green. Our goal is therefore to fabricate a fast fish-like robot swimming using biometric fish locomotion using MFCs and IPMCs.

MFCs and IPMCs can be used as a main propulsion system, caudal fin, since it yields relatively high blocking force and it can bend significantly by controlling the amount of voltage applied to the actuators. These material characteristics will enable the robotic fish to replicate underwater fish movement. In order to fabricate fastest fish possible, the shape of the robotic fish also has to be similar to real fast underwater fish, which the tuna fish is chosen for this project. Tuna fish is not only the third fastest fish in the world but also its large torso can contain all necessary electronic components to provide enough power to the robotic fish. There has been some previous researches developing different types of robotic fish; however, fabricating a fastest robotic fish based on smart materials is a fairly new research area and we have been very interested in building one and testing it in the nonlinear waves lab located in the college of engineering.

For this rapid robotic fish, the motion control can be achieved by wired connections for the first prototype. The module will control yawing and pitching of the fish. The body and tail portion of the fish will be made using frame and heat shrink films since it provides necessary internal space and demanding rigidity. The main propulsion in the tail will be controlled by one or two or three MFC bimorph actuators. The MFCs will bend the fish tail mimicking the motion of real tuna fish.

Once this research has accomplished, it can be used as an application platform to unfold series of marine and robotic researches. Our project will be done combining multi-disciplinary areas including Applied Mathematics (generate fish motion equation), Materials (composites application), Structures, Fluid Dynamics (hydrostatic prediction and propulsion calculation) and Bionics (analyzing the motion of real-world sea creatures to improve our design).

The main objective of this project is to build and test a rapid robotic fish with its propulsion system based on smart material actuators, such as Macro Fiber Composites (MFC) and Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMC). These state-of-the-art actuators based on active materials offer several potential advantages for robotic fish applications compared to traditional servo motors. One important benefit is that smart actuators are lightweight and can be embedded directly into the structure of a fish torso or control surface. In addition, they are eco-friendly and are completely green. Our goal is therefore to fabricate a fast fish-like robot swimming using biometric fish locomotion using MFCs and IPMCs.

MFCs and IPMCs can be used as a main propulsion system, caudal fin, since it yields relatively high blocking force and it can bend significantly by controlling the amount of voltage applied to the actuators. These material characteristics will enable the robotic fish to replicate underwater fish movement. In order to fabricate fastest fish possible, the shape of the robotic fish also has to be similar to real fast underwater fish, which the tuna fish is chosen for this project. Tuna fish is not only the third fastest fish in the world but also its large torso can contain all necessary electronic components to provide enough power to the robotic fish. There has been some previous researches developing different types of robotic fish; however, fabricating a fastest robotic fish based on smart materials is a fairly new research area and we have been very interested in building one and testing it in the nonlinear waves lab located in the college of engineering.

For this rapid robotic fish, the motion control can be achieved by wired connections for the first prototype. The module will control yawing and pitching of the fish. The body and tail portion of the fish will be made using frame and heat shrink films since it provides necessary internal space and demanding rigidity. The main propulsion in the tail will be controlled by one or two or three MFC bimorph actuators. The MFCs will bend the fish tail mimicking the motion of real tuna fish.

Once this research has accomplished, it can be used as an application platform to unfold series of marine and robotic researches. Our project will be done combining multi-disciplinary areas including Applied Mathematics (generate fish motion equation), Materials (composites application), Structures, Fluid Dynamics (hydrostatic prediction and propulsion calculation) and Bionics (analyzing the motion of real-world sea creatures to improve our design).

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes

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Development of Rapid Robotic Fish based on Smart Material Actuators

The main objective of this project is to build and test a rapid robotic fish with its propulsion system based on smart material actuators, such as Macro Fiber Composites (MFC) and Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMC). These state-of-the-art actuators based on active materials offer several potential advantages for robotic fish applications compared to traditional servo motors. One important benefit is that smart actuators are lightweight and can be embedded directly into the structure of a fish torso or control surface. In addition, they are eco-friendly and are completely green. Our goal is therefore to fabricate a fast fish-like robot swimming using biometric fish locomotion using MFCs and IPMCs.

MFCs and IPMCs can be used as a main propulsion system, caudal fin, since it yields relatively high blocking force and it can bend significantly by controlling the amount of voltage applied to the actuators. These material characteristics will enable the robotic fish to replicate underwater fish movement. In order to fabricate fastest fish possible, the shape of the robotic fish also has to be similar to real fast underwater fish, which the tuna fish is chosen for this project. Tuna fish is not only the third fastest fish in the world but also its large torso can contain all necessary electronic components to provide enough power to the robotic fish. There has been some previous researches developing different types of robotic fish; however, fabricating a fastest robotic fish based on smart materials is a fairly new research area and we have been very interested in building one and testing it in the nonlinear waves lab located in the college of engineering.

For this rapid robotic fish, the motion control can be achieved by wired connections for the first prototype. The module will control yawing and pitching of the fish. The body and tail portion of the fish will be made using frame and heat shrink films since it provides necessary internal space and demanding rigidity. The main propulsion in the tail will be controlled by one or two or three MFC bimorph actuators. The MFCs will bend the fish tail mimicking the motion of real tuna fish.

Once this research has accomplished, it can be used as an application platform to unfold series of marine and robotic researches. Our project will be done combining multi-disciplinary areas including Applied Mathematics (generate fish motion equation), Materials (composites application), Structures, Fluid Dynamics (hydrostatic prediction and propulsion calculation) and Bionics (analyzing the motion of real-world sea creatures to improve our design).

The main objective of this project is to build and test a rapid robotic fish with its propulsion system based on smart material actuators, such as Macro Fiber Composites (MFC) and Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMC). These state-of-the-art actuators based on active materials offer several potential advantages for robotic fish applications compared to traditional servo motors. One important benefit is that smart actuators are lightweight and can be embedded directly into the structure of a fish torso or control surface. In addition, they are eco-friendly and are completely green. Our goal is therefore to fabricate a fast fish-like robot swimming using biometric fish locomotion using MFCs and IPMCs.

MFCs and IPMCs can be used as a main propulsion system, caudal fin, since it yields relatively high blocking force and it can bend significantly by controlling the amount of voltage applied to the actuators. These material characteristics will enable the robotic fish to replicate underwater fish movement. In order to fabricate fastest fish possible, the shape of the robotic fish also has to be similar to real fast underwater fish, which the tuna fish is chosen for this project. Tuna fish is not only the third fastest fish in the world but also its large torso can contain all necessary electronic components to provide enough power to the robotic fish. There has been some previous researches developing different types of robotic fish; however, fabricating a fastest robotic fish based on smart materials is a fairly new research area and we have been very interested in building one and testing it in the nonlinear waves lab located in the college of engineering.

For this rapid robotic fish, the motion control can be achieved by wired connections for the first prototype. The module will control yawing and pitching of the fish. The body and tail portion of the fish will be made using frame and heat shrink films since it provides necessary internal space and demanding rigidity. The main propulsion in the tail will be controlled by one or two or three MFC bimorph actuators. The MFCs will bend the fish tail mimicking the motion of real tuna fish.

Once this research has accomplished, it can be used as an application platform to unfold series of marine and robotic researches. Our project will be done combining multi-disciplinary areas including Applied Mathematics (generate fish motion equation), Materials (composites application), Structures, Fluid Dynamics (hydrostatic prediction and propulsion calculation) and Bionics (analyzing the motion of real-world sea creatures to improve our design).

 

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