Abstract Title

A Case Study of B/C Analysis of Automated Incident Detection (AID) System

group

Authors' Class Standing

Nathaniel Anderson - Senior Richard Pearl- Senior

Lead Presenter's Name

Nathaniel Anderson & Richard Pearl

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Hongyun Chen

Abstract

Vehicles idling in traffic due to congestion cost billions of dollars in wasted time and fuel (FHA 2000). Automated Incident Detection (AID) provides an intelligent transportation system a means of detecting traffic related incidents that cause variations in vehicle flow on our roadways. AID systems can then respond to the situation using Traffic Incident Management strategy, and optimize traffic using en route technology. Current implementation of AID systems are widespread, but do not cover all major US roadways.

The goal of this research is to do a cost-benefit analysis on current AID systems implemented domestically, in order to develop improvements in its employment and efficiency. A case study will be conducted by collecting traffic data from a CORSIM model of a 5-10 mile section of Florida freeway system. A benefit over cost analysis and report will be compiled using data from the simulation run at the freeway’s current efficiency versus the simulation run at the expected efficiency after implementing AID systems. Data obtained from the analysis of the simulation, as well as research based on costs associated with purchase and production of AID systems will allow for recommendations in future AID operations and traffic efficiency.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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A Case Study of B/C Analysis of Automated Incident Detection (AID) System

Vehicles idling in traffic due to congestion cost billions of dollars in wasted time and fuel (FHA 2000). Automated Incident Detection (AID) provides an intelligent transportation system a means of detecting traffic related incidents that cause variations in vehicle flow on our roadways. AID systems can then respond to the situation using Traffic Incident Management strategy, and optimize traffic using en route technology. Current implementation of AID systems are widespread, but do not cover all major US roadways.

The goal of this research is to do a cost-benefit analysis on current AID systems implemented domestically, in order to develop improvements in its employment and efficiency. A case study will be conducted by collecting traffic data from a CORSIM model of a 5-10 mile section of Florida freeway system. A benefit over cost analysis and report will be compiled using data from the simulation run at the freeway’s current efficiency versus the simulation run at the expected efficiency after implementing AID systems. Data obtained from the analysis of the simulation, as well as research based on costs associated with purchase and production of AID systems will allow for recommendations in future AID operations and traffic efficiency.