group

Authors' Class Standing

Chris Hays, Sophomore Alex Seifans, Junior Delaney Hancock, Freshman Anthony Oreo, Freshman Parker Tyson, Sophomore Chris Forte, Sophomore Paul Lepre, Sophomore Zach White, Sophomore Fletcher Buckley, Sophomore

Lead Presenter's Name

Chris Hays

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jeff Brown

Abstract

Worldwide, 783 million people do not have access to clean water; 319 million of them reside in Sub-Saharan Africa. In this region, the transportation of water from its source to its point-of-use can be arduous to complete using current methods. The men and women in developing communities must exert considerable effort to retrieve the few gallons of water they need to survive. Due to the lack of infrastructure and no external source of energy, new methods to transport the water must be capable of generating their own energy. The Archimedes Initiative has set out to identify a mechanically powered pump that performs as effectively as an electrical pump based on the following criteria: a 5-10L/min flow rate, 1-mile flow distance, and 150 ft. vertical head distance. The team will conduct research into the efficiency and performance of both hybrid and mechanical systems. At the project’s conclusion, The Archimedes Initiative plans to have a fully functioning wind-powered water pump capable of meeting the design criteria. The project is currently ongoing and much progress has been made towards developing preliminary designs and a viable prototype. After several iterations of design review and redesign, the team plans to begin construction of a prototype in January and testing is scheduled for February 2017. A fully functioning and usable prototype will be complete by the conclusion of the 2016-2017 school year.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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A Comparison of Mechanical and Electrical Wind-Powered Water Pumps

Worldwide, 783 million people do not have access to clean water; 319 million of them reside in Sub-Saharan Africa. In this region, the transportation of water from its source to its point-of-use can be arduous to complete using current methods. The men and women in developing communities must exert considerable effort to retrieve the few gallons of water they need to survive. Due to the lack of infrastructure and no external source of energy, new methods to transport the water must be capable of generating their own energy. The Archimedes Initiative has set out to identify a mechanically powered pump that performs as effectively as an electrical pump based on the following criteria: a 5-10L/min flow rate, 1-mile flow distance, and 150 ft. vertical head distance. The team will conduct research into the efficiency and performance of both hybrid and mechanical systems. At the project’s conclusion, The Archimedes Initiative plans to have a fully functioning wind-powered water pump capable of meeting the design criteria. The project is currently ongoing and much progress has been made towards developing preliminary designs and a viable prototype. After several iterations of design review and redesign, the team plans to begin construction of a prototype in January and testing is scheduled for February 2017. A fully functioning and usable prototype will be complete by the conclusion of the 2016-2017 school year.

 

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