Presenter Email

mary.niemczyk@asu.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2017 3:15 PM

End Date

15-8-2017 4:45 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Generational training

Keywords

Millennials, instruction, training, learning, Gen Y, Gen Z, job readiness

Abstract

Air transportation has proven to be an extremely safe, efficient and reliable means for travel – a testament to highly effective instruction and training. Airlines are forecasted to continue their rapid expansion over the next 20 years needing to hire more than 2 million aviation personnel (Boeing, 2015). As Baby Boomers retire, at the rate of 10,000 per day/4 million per year, a ‘generational replacement’ or shift will occur with Gen Y and Z members taking their places in the workforce.

Each generation is impacted by significant events during their developmental adolescent years. For Gen Y members, technological and K-12 educational changes have caused the biggest impacts. Research results have found this generation to exhibit reduced attention spans, shallow thinking as well as diminished spelling and math skills. Fewer individuals are reading books and 36% of first year college students report taking remedial courses, especially in math – all creating a huge gap in job readiness.

The instructional strategies used in the past need to be modified to ensure these individuals successfully acquire necessary knowledge and skills. It is also critical that Gen Y and Z members be taught learning strategies that will enable them to be effective lifelong learners. Participants in this session will learn about those strategies, based in neuroscience and educational psychology, found to be effective in teaching both collegiate aviators and new hires.

Presenter Biography

Dr. Mary Niemczyk is an Associate professor in the Aviation programs at Arizona State University. Before joining the Aviation faculty, Dr. Niemczyk earned her PhD in Learning & Instructional Technology at ASU. She has also worked as a financial analyst at a major US carrier and co-founded an aviation human performance company, which mostly focused on determining the best instructional methods for training pilots on technologically advanced aircraft. Additionally, Dr. Niemczyk is an FAA certified pilot.

Dr. Niemczyk’s research interests center on improving instructional and learning strategies to enhance the performance of individuals in complex, ill-defined environments, such as aviation. Her work also focuses on determining the best attributes, knowledge and skills that can lead to successful performance in aviation training and job performance, as well as how to incorporate and effectively utilize the talents of the Millennial generation in the Aviation industry. The results of her research have been widely published in peer-reviewed aviation and education journals.

As a faculty member at ASU, Dr. Niemczyk has taught 13 different aviation courses, and developed three new courses. Because of her background in learning and instruction, Dr. Niemczyk is often invited by University’s to conduct external reviews of their Aviation programs. She also serves as a Visiting Team Chair for the Aviation Accreditation Board International (AABI) and has served as an Educator Trustee on the AABI Board. Dr. Niemczyk is also a past-president of the University Aviation Association (UAA).

In addition, Dr. Niemczyk founded Mastering Learning, which provides faculty and students resources to improve instruction and learning. Two such resources are her handbook, Using Your Brain to Learn: Strategies for Success, and ebook How to Study in College: Proven Strategies for Success. Dr. Niemczyk regularly conducts workshops on learning, instruction and performance improvement for industry, faculty, students and parents.

Most recently, Dr. Niemczyk co-founded boxxed, an organization which provides solutions for improving workplace performance by bridging the gap between generational cohorts.

View Mary Niemczyk’s Bio Page

1084 Niemczyk.pptx (1909 kB)
Original PowerPoint, Full-res

 
Aug 15th, 3:15 PM Aug 15th, 4:45 PM

Generational Shift: Why We Should Modify Our Instructional Strategies for the Next Generations of Aviators

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Air transportation has proven to be an extremely safe, efficient and reliable means for travel – a testament to highly effective instruction and training. Airlines are forecasted to continue their rapid expansion over the next 20 years needing to hire more than 2 million aviation personnel (Boeing, 2015). As Baby Boomers retire, at the rate of 10,000 per day/4 million per year, a ‘generational replacement’ or shift will occur with Gen Y and Z members taking their places in the workforce.

Each generation is impacted by significant events during their developmental adolescent years. For Gen Y members, technological and K-12 educational changes have caused the biggest impacts. Research results have found this generation to exhibit reduced attention spans, shallow thinking as well as diminished spelling and math skills. Fewer individuals are reading books and 36% of first year college students report taking remedial courses, especially in math – all creating a huge gap in job readiness.

The instructional strategies used in the past need to be modified to ensure these individuals successfully acquire necessary knowledge and skills. It is also critical that Gen Y and Z members be taught learning strategies that will enable them to be effective lifelong learners. Participants in this session will learn about those strategies, based in neuroscience and educational psychology, found to be effective in teaching both collegiate aviators and new hires.

 

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