Paper Title

Analytics and 4DTBO for Integration of RLV into the NAS

Presentation Type

Paper (supporting PowerPoints may be added as Additional Files)

Location

Henderson Welcome Center

Start Date

17-11-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

Space launches and recoveries have until recently been the remit of government involving the closure of a significant amount of airspace. However, commercial operations, initially as contracted operations for government will soon be in the majority and commercial space launches will become a regular occurrence. While commercial aircraft operators accept government imposed airspace reservations, acceptance of routine airspace closures for commercial space launches and recoveries will be less welcome. The large airspace reservations are only feasible for coastal states. Yet, inland states also wish to be involved in commercial space where airspace reservations for launch and recovery are not commercially feasible. Air Traffic Management is also changing toward Trajectory Based Operations which could simplify a shared airspace approach to spaceflight operations. Months prior to launch, analytics will be used to identify quiet periods of operations in the NAS around spaceports and recommend appropriate days at identified spaceports. The launch vehicle will follow a precise insertion trajectory with restricted exigency airspace that can be assessed for conflict against aircraft trajectories. Aircraft can be deconflicted with the launch vehicle as it launches. Similarly, deorbit planning can be treated as a trajectory from which aircraft will be deconflicted. Analytics will again show which is the best spaceport and time for recovery. A similar approach to will be used to deconflict recovering launch and space vehicles.

Area of Interest

NAS Integration

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Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Analytics and 4DTBO for Integration of RLV into the NAS

Henderson Welcome Center

Space launches and recoveries have until recently been the remit of government involving the closure of a significant amount of airspace. However, commercial operations, initially as contracted operations for government will soon be in the majority and commercial space launches will become a regular occurrence. While commercial aircraft operators accept government imposed airspace reservations, acceptance of routine airspace closures for commercial space launches and recoveries will be less welcome. The large airspace reservations are only feasible for coastal states. Yet, inland states also wish to be involved in commercial space where airspace reservations for launch and recovery are not commercially feasible. Air Traffic Management is also changing toward Trajectory Based Operations which could simplify a shared airspace approach to spaceflight operations. Months prior to launch, analytics will be used to identify quiet periods of operations in the NAS around spaceports and recommend appropriate days at identified spaceports. The launch vehicle will follow a precise insertion trajectory with restricted exigency airspace that can be assessed for conflict against aircraft trajectories. Aircraft can be deconflicted with the launch vehicle as it launches. Similarly, deorbit planning can be treated as a trajectory from which aircraft will be deconflicted. Analytics will again show which is the best spaceport and time for recovery. A similar approach to will be used to deconflict recovering launch and space vehicles.