Abstract Title

Project Thetis

Author Information

Grace RobertsonFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Authors' Class Standing

Grace Robertson, Sophomore

Lead Presenter's Name

Grace Robertson

Faculty Mentor Name

Lisa Davids

Abstract

Project Thetis is a 35-member team comprised of 4 sub-teams including design, software, electrical and logistics. Our project aims to reduce the commonality of micro-plastics by extracting them from anhydrous sand samples. Micro-plastics are the most common form of pollutant in marine systems, but in the last year have been reported in every tested ecosystem including mountain ranges around the globe, freshwater systems, and the atmosphere. We have chosen to focus on micro-plastic extraction from anhydrous sand as it is a neglected ecosystem in current efforts to remove micro-plastics from the environment. Extraction will be done using electric force attraction between a surface with induced charge and the micro-plastics. Extracted micro-plastics will be held in the robot until they are deposited in its stationary home unit. Software will be designed to use a GPS system with geofencing to ensure the robot performs its task within a specified area. The design phase for the robot will be completed by the first week of November 2019.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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Project Thetis

Project Thetis is a 35-member team comprised of 4 sub-teams including design, software, electrical and logistics. Our project aims to reduce the commonality of micro-plastics by extracting them from anhydrous sand samples. Micro-plastics are the most common form of pollutant in marine systems, but in the last year have been reported in every tested ecosystem including mountain ranges around the globe, freshwater systems, and the atmosphere. We have chosen to focus on micro-plastic extraction from anhydrous sand as it is a neglected ecosystem in current efforts to remove micro-plastics from the environment. Extraction will be done using electric force attraction between a surface with induced charge and the micro-plastics. Extracted micro-plastics will be held in the robot until they are deposited in its stationary home unit. Software will be designed to use a GPS system with geofencing to ensure the robot performs its task within a specified area. The design phase for the robot will be completed by the first week of November 2019.