group

Authors' Class Standing

William Shelstad, Graduate Student Matthew Pierce, Graduate Student Emily Rickel, Junior Philip Young, Graduate Student Barbara S. Chaparro, Faculty

Lead Presenter's Name

Emily Rickel

Faculty Mentor Name

Barbara S. Chaparro

Abstract

This study demonstrates the user experience measurement technique of Out-of-Box Experience (OOBE) with a commercially available strategy board game. This method of study explores a user’s first impressions with a product, and has yet to be tested on board games in current literature. Participants were observed as they used the board game for the first time in each of the following four stages: Unboxing, Setup, Initial Play, and Disassembly. Participants were also queried for their feedback and expectations during each phase. Analysis of this data revealed several themes contributing to overall user satisfaction. Players gravitated to the art style, look, and theme of the board and pieces. However, users were frustrated with the instructions, assembly, and fundamental mechanics of gameplay. These themes can be used for design recommendations and improvements for similar board games. These findings demonstrate how OOBE can be applied to different applications, facilitating unique and interesting data that researchers would otherwise be unable to achieve.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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Thinking "Out-of-the-Box" with Board Games

This study demonstrates the user experience measurement technique of Out-of-Box Experience (OOBE) with a commercially available strategy board game. This method of study explores a user’s first impressions with a product, and has yet to be tested on board games in current literature. Participants were observed as they used the board game for the first time in each of the following four stages: Unboxing, Setup, Initial Play, and Disassembly. Participants were also queried for their feedback and expectations during each phase. Analysis of this data revealed several themes contributing to overall user satisfaction. Players gravitated to the art style, look, and theme of the board and pieces. However, users were frustrated with the instructions, assembly, and fundamental mechanics of gameplay. These themes can be used for design recommendations and improvements for similar board games. These findings demonstrate how OOBE can be applied to different applications, facilitating unique and interesting data that researchers would otherwise be unable to achieve.

 

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