Author Information

Morgan LopezFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

individual

Authors' Class Standing

Morgan Lopez, Senior

Lead Presenter's Name

Morgan Lopez

Faculty Mentor Name

David Keck

Abstract

This research examines the outlook in approach to care for the leprosy patients at Culion Leprosarium in the Philippines through medical, social, and religious aspects of life at Culion. Frederick and Elizabeth Jansen, Presbyterian missionaries, received criticism for caring for Protestant leprosy patients as if they would never leave Culion. Tension between Protestants and Catholics at Culion revealed a disparity in the outlook of treatment for patients. Catholics tended to focus on treatment and recovery of patients with the objective of returning them to Filipino society. Protestant missionaries focused on establishing a lasting refuge for the patients at Culion. Would the patients with leprosy remain at Culion for their entire lives or would they eventually be cured and remain healthy enough to return to Filipino society? The Catholic and Protestant missionaries and doctors alleviated the physical and spiritual anguish of the people of Culion. In spite of this, apathy lingered among the patients. Patients cured of leprosy were allowed to return home or remain at Culion. The remaining patients participated in work, schooling, and farming at Culion. Frederick Jansen noted that work such as tailoring and carpentry, schooling, improved infrastructure, and availability of smallholdings for farming boosted the morale of patients.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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The Life of Patients at Culion Leprosarium

This research examines the outlook in approach to care for the leprosy patients at Culion Leprosarium in the Philippines through medical, social, and religious aspects of life at Culion. Frederick and Elizabeth Jansen, Presbyterian missionaries, received criticism for caring for Protestant leprosy patients as if they would never leave Culion. Tension between Protestants and Catholics at Culion revealed a disparity in the outlook of treatment for patients. Catholics tended to focus on treatment and recovery of patients with the objective of returning them to Filipino society. Protestant missionaries focused on establishing a lasting refuge for the patients at Culion. Would the patients with leprosy remain at Culion for their entire lives or would they eventually be cured and remain healthy enough to return to Filipino society? The Catholic and Protestant missionaries and doctors alleviated the physical and spiritual anguish of the people of Culion. In spite of this, apathy lingered among the patients. Patients cured of leprosy were allowed to return home or remain at Culion. The remaining patients participated in work, schooling, and farming at Culion. Frederick Jansen noted that work such as tailoring and carpentry, schooling, improved infrastructure, and availability of smallholdings for farming boosted the morale of patients.

 

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