Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Authors' Class Standing

Zachary Henry, Junior Ryan Sitler, Junior Daniel Sommer, Junior Andrew Verdes, Junior Drew Russo, Junior Chris Morrow, Junior Alex Decat, Junior Nathan Weinstock, Junior Ferdinand Boudreau, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Ryan Sitler

Faculty Mentor Name

Andrei Ludu

Abstract

As part of the early development of a Hall-effect thruster, a type of advanced electric propulsion system, a prototype thruster body was built for the purpose of experimentation. To be as close as possible to reality, the prototype was designed and built under the assumption that it would be fireable. As such, it is equipped with a ceramic discharge chamber, as well as with customized electromagnets which use 28 AWG magnet wire and 1010 steel for the cores. The field is measured using Hall sensors for comparison with a mathematical model of the field. Physical systems and mathematical models can be used to iteratively improve one another, so this experiment serves as a beginning to the much larger project of fully developing a fully functional thruster system. Results of this experiment will affect the progress of development, either requiring system modifications or allowing for further system design.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

Share

COinS
 

Measurement of Magnetic Flux in a Hall Thruster for Comparison to Mathematical Model

As part of the early development of a Hall-effect thruster, a type of advanced electric propulsion system, a prototype thruster body was built for the purpose of experimentation. To be as close as possible to reality, the prototype was designed and built under the assumption that it would be fireable. As such, it is equipped with a ceramic discharge chamber, as well as with customized electromagnets which use 28 AWG magnet wire and 1010 steel for the cores. The field is measured using Hall sensors for comparison with a mathematical model of the field. Physical systems and mathematical models can be used to iteratively improve one another, so this experiment serves as a beginning to the much larger project of fully developing a fully functional thruster system. Results of this experiment will affect the progress of development, either requiring system modifications or allowing for further system design.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.