Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Authors' Class Standing

Celine Bounds, Senior Hannah Thomas, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Hannah Thomas

Faculty Mentor Name

Scott Parr

Abstract

External disruptions to a port may result for storms, such as Hurricane Mathew and Super Storm Sandy, as well as terrorism and oil/hazardous material spill. The overall impact of a disruption on a port is a function of vulnerability of the port and severity of the disruption. The resiliency of ports and inland waterways is critical for maintaining the flow of essential goods throughout the United States and is critical to national security and defense readiness (Sturgis et al., 2014). The research seeks to build upon prior knowledge and expand the scientific understanding of regional disruptions to port clusters, areas of the country with multiple ports servicing the same region. This research will be implicated through the identification of port clusters in the United States that have experienced a major disruptive event. Data will then be collected from ports within these port clusters and a detained time line of events will be developed for each port during its respective destructive event. Port operations will then be systematically quantified as before, during, and after said event. This will enable the identification of trends, patterns, and relationships between the ports throughout their recovery process. Time-depending resiliency plots will be developed to quantify the resiliency of the ports throughout the event. The contribution of this research is to empirically show how port clusters rely upon each other during disruptive events to increase the overall resiliency of water bourn commerce during disruptive events.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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Interdependency of Port clusters During Regional Disasters

External disruptions to a port may result for storms, such as Hurricane Mathew and Super Storm Sandy, as well as terrorism and oil/hazardous material spill. The overall impact of a disruption on a port is a function of vulnerability of the port and severity of the disruption. The resiliency of ports and inland waterways is critical for maintaining the flow of essential goods throughout the United States and is critical to national security and defense readiness (Sturgis et al., 2014). The research seeks to build upon prior knowledge and expand the scientific understanding of regional disruptions to port clusters, areas of the country with multiple ports servicing the same region. This research will be implicated through the identification of port clusters in the United States that have experienced a major disruptive event. Data will then be collected from ports within these port clusters and a detained time line of events will be developed for each port during its respective destructive event. Port operations will then be systematically quantified as before, during, and after said event. This will enable the identification of trends, patterns, and relationships between the ports throughout their recovery process. Time-depending resiliency plots will be developed to quantify the resiliency of the ports throughout the event. The contribution of this research is to empirically show how port clusters rely upon each other during disruptive events to increase the overall resiliency of water bourn commerce during disruptive events.

 

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