Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Authors' Class Standing

Mike Conway, Senior Daniel Roberts, Senior

Lead Presenter's Name

Michael Conway

Faculty Mentor Name

Wes Lewis & Dr. Kelly George

Abstract

Iceland’s energy comes almost completely from renewable resources, with 76% of it being hydroelectric energy, and the remainder being geothermal energy and wind power (Landsvirkjun, 2018). For several months we conducted secondary-source research on Iceland's renewable energy resources, and the effect climate change will have on them throughout the next century. Most importantly, we researched how the Icelandic Government plans on responding to these changes. The Earth's rising temperatures are causing a shrinkage of Iceland’s glaciers, and changing the water runoff rates from these glaciers at an alarming rate. The rates are currently increasing, but over time, will decrease until the glaciers have completely melted. In order to discover more about the repercussions of climate change, we travelled to Iceland, and conducted in-person interviews with both industry professionals, and common Icelanders to examine their opinions on the issue.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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CLIMATE CHANGE’S EFFECTS ON RENEWABLE ENERGY IN ICELAND

Iceland’s energy comes almost completely from renewable resources, with 76% of it being hydroelectric energy, and the remainder being geothermal energy and wind power (Landsvirkjun, 2018). For several months we conducted secondary-source research on Iceland's renewable energy resources, and the effect climate change will have on them throughout the next century. Most importantly, we researched how the Icelandic Government plans on responding to these changes. The Earth's rising temperatures are causing a shrinkage of Iceland’s glaciers, and changing the water runoff rates from these glaciers at an alarming rate. The rates are currently increasing, but over time, will decrease until the glaciers have completely melted. In order to discover more about the repercussions of climate change, we travelled to Iceland, and conducted in-person interviews with both industry professionals, and common Icelanders to examine their opinions on the issue.

 

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