Author Information

Riya JoshiFollow

individual

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Riya Joshi, freshman

Lead Presenter's Name

Riya Joshi

Faculty Mentor Name

Wesley Lewis

Abstract

The deterioration of Earth due to overpopulation, pollution, the increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and other conditions, is prompting the research of possible migration opportunities to other planets. Considerable, plausible futures for planet Earth end at the elimination of any forms of life currently present on its surface, in its atmosphere, or in its oceans. The emigration of the human race to another cosmos is inevitable especially considering the rapid decline of the planet today. Two such probable habitable worlds include Venus and Mars, the second and fourth planets of our solar system, respectively. Temperature, pressure, atmospheric climate, surface climate, distance from the sun, and other such variables require key investigation to verify a possible life-affirming future for either Venus or Mars. This takes into account various fields of study, including geology, planetary science, meteorology, astronomy, spectroscopy, biology, and chemistry. To an outsider, the dry, rocky surface of Mars and the hot, sulfuric atmosphere of Venus mean that life could never survive, never mind thrive on either planet. However, further research indicates that with certain modifications, habitation on one, or both, planets is entirely possible. With a thorough analysis of the past climates of both planets, it is seen that in their early histories, both possessed environments that could very likely be home to many unknown, undiscovered, and unexplored life forms unimaginable to the human mind today. Evidence of bodies of water and a sustainable atmosphere for both planets has been found leading to additional, detailed research on potential futures for both Mars and Venus. Upon further analysis, researchers came to the conclusion that the surface of the Martian planet is more habitable, not its atmosphere, and visa versa for the Vesuvian planet. Several more differences between the two prove how possible a future home on either planet could be.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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The Comparison of Venus vs. Mars in relation to Terraformation

The deterioration of Earth due to overpopulation, pollution, the increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and other conditions, is prompting the research of possible migration opportunities to other planets. Considerable, plausible futures for planet Earth end at the elimination of any forms of life currently present on its surface, in its atmosphere, or in its oceans. The emigration of the human race to another cosmos is inevitable especially considering the rapid decline of the planet today. Two such probable habitable worlds include Venus and Mars, the second and fourth planets of our solar system, respectively. Temperature, pressure, atmospheric climate, surface climate, distance from the sun, and other such variables require key investigation to verify a possible life-affirming future for either Venus or Mars. This takes into account various fields of study, including geology, planetary science, meteorology, astronomy, spectroscopy, biology, and chemistry. To an outsider, the dry, rocky surface of Mars and the hot, sulfuric atmosphere of Venus mean that life could never survive, never mind thrive on either planet. However, further research indicates that with certain modifications, habitation on one, or both, planets is entirely possible. With a thorough analysis of the past climates of both planets, it is seen that in their early histories, both possessed environments that could very likely be home to many unknown, undiscovered, and unexplored life forms unimaginable to the human mind today. Evidence of bodies of water and a sustainable atmosphere for both planets has been found leading to additional, detailed research on potential futures for both Mars and Venus. Upon further analysis, researchers came to the conclusion that the surface of the Martian planet is more habitable, not its atmosphere, and visa versa for the Vesuvian planet. Several more differences between the two prove how possible a future home on either planet could be.

 

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