Author Information

Shlok MisraFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

individual

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Shlok Misra, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Shlok Misra

Faculty Mentor Name

Michele Halleran

Abstract

This study was designed to evaluate the effects of utilizing Electronic Flight Bags (EFBs) in flight training with emphasis on preflight skill development and Aeronautical Decision Making. The study participants were student pilots or private pilots who used EFBs in flight training and had not logged more than 100 total flight hours. The study utilized a simulation of the preflight process of a Visual Flight Rules cross country flight in which the participants answered questions related to the flight preparation. Fifty percent of the study’s population completed this survey with the information provided through an EFB and the other 50% population had to answer the questions without an EFB using traditional unabridged raw data. A comparative analysis of the data collected from both groups was performed. The largest degradation of performance was noted in Notices to Airmen (NOTAM) interpretation and the least degradation in performance was noted in weather-related decision-making.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

Share

COinS
 

The Effect of Electronic Flight Bags in Flight Training on Preflight Skill Development and Aeronautical Decision Making

This study was designed to evaluate the effects of utilizing Electronic Flight Bags (EFBs) in flight training with emphasis on preflight skill development and Aeronautical Decision Making. The study participants were student pilots or private pilots who used EFBs in flight training and had not logged more than 100 total flight hours. The study utilized a simulation of the preflight process of a Visual Flight Rules cross country flight in which the participants answered questions related to the flight preparation. Fifty percent of the study’s population completed this survey with the information provided through an EFB and the other 50% population had to answer the questions without an EFB using traditional unabridged raw data. A comparative analysis of the data collected from both groups was performed. The largest degradation of performance was noted in Notices to Airmen (NOTAM) interpretation and the least degradation in performance was noted in weather-related decision-making.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.