Abstract Title

Project S.H.R.E.D.

Author Information

Noah IngwersenFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Noah Ingwersen, Senior

Lead Presenter's Name

Noah Ingwersen

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Zheng Zhang

Abstract

Since the inception of surfing, the design of the fins attached to the bottom of the surfboard to give control has largely remained the same. These surfboard fins behave very similar to airfoils; they provide lift, have a camber, chord line and sweep. The goal of this research project is to design more efficient surfboard fins by using engineering concepts taught in the classroom as well as draw inspiration from the aviation industry. This is done by first designing the fin using tools such as xFoil as well as hand analysis. The fin is then modeled in CATIA and run through Ansys Fluent, a computation fluid dynamics software. Next, the fin is 3D printed and coated in a layer of fiberglass before being tested in a wind tunnel and in the water against other fins on the market. Results of this analysis show the different fin’s top speed in the water, lift force of the fin and drag force of the fin. These values are used to determine which fin is most efficient.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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Project S.H.R.E.D.

Since the inception of surfing, the design of the fins attached to the bottom of the surfboard to give control has largely remained the same. These surfboard fins behave very similar to airfoils; they provide lift, have a camber, chord line and sweep. The goal of this research project is to design more efficient surfboard fins by using engineering concepts taught in the classroom as well as draw inspiration from the aviation industry. This is done by first designing the fin using tools such as xFoil as well as hand analysis. The fin is then modeled in CATIA and run through Ansys Fluent, a computation fluid dynamics software. Next, the fin is 3D printed and coated in a layer of fiberglass before being tested in a wind tunnel and in the water against other fins on the market. Results of this analysis show the different fin’s top speed in the water, lift force of the fin and drag force of the fin. These values are used to determine which fin is most efficient.

 

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