Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Daytona Beach

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Nikita Amberkar - Senior Manikandan Vairamani - Phd candidate

Lead Presenter's Name

Nikita Amberkar

Faculty Mentor Name

Sathya Gangadhran

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Abstract

Sloshing poses a serious challenge in the design of satellites, spacecraft and launch vehicles. Sloshing can be affected by either passive or active measures. Passive slosh damping through either fixed internal baffles or other propellant management devices (PMD) is effective for low-amplitude slosh at low fill fractions but is less effective for higher fill fractions and higher amplitude slosh. Further it reduces the available propellant volume inside the tank and requires significant mass budget to implement effectively.

The Magneto-active Propellant Management Device (MAPMD) system includes the membrane floating on the propellant surface and a control system that utilizes low-power electromagnetic coils to detect the position of the membrane within the tank, assess the slosh state of the liquid within the tank, and apply appropriate magnetic forces to the floating membrane to suppress incipient slosh.

The slosh test bed at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) is an experimental setup consisting of a dynamic force balance with three movable arms attached to a single axis actuator from Aerotech called Linear Motion Actuator (LMA). A pair of FUTEK LCM 300 (Tension and Compression) dynamic load cell is attached at the end of each movable arms. The sensitivity of the load cell is rated at 250 lbs or 1112 N. These load cells measure the forces acting on tank walls and resolve them into forces and moments. Motion of the actuator is accomplished by a custom built LabVIEW code coupled with Aerotech’s soloist CP software at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

The test tank is a clear polycarbonate cylindrical vessel of diameter 6 inches and length 8 inches. The external control system consists of two external wire coils each consisting of 100 turns of 12-AWG magnet winding wire, and (2) programmable DC power supplies capable of providing 1A of current at 12V. The coils are spaced at intervals equal to the coil radius, effectively creating a series of Helmholtz Coils. The Helmholtz configuration is advantageous because it creates a region of uniform magnetic field between two coils when the current supplied to each coil is the same. As a result, over 90% of the tank volume can be subjected to a constant, static magnetic field enough to stiffen the membrane and suppress slosh.

The proposed MAPMD addresses all the challenges stated above through a simple, innovative solution that could prove to be cost effective and lead to better control performance of satellites, space craft and launch vehicles.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark, SURF, Research Abroad, Student Internal Grants, or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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Magneto Active Slosh Control System - MAPMD

Sloshing poses a serious challenge in the design of satellites, spacecraft and launch vehicles. Sloshing can be affected by either passive or active measures. Passive slosh damping through either fixed internal baffles or other propellant management devices (PMD) is effective for low-amplitude slosh at low fill fractions but is less effective for higher fill fractions and higher amplitude slosh. Further it reduces the available propellant volume inside the tank and requires significant mass budget to implement effectively.

The Magneto-active Propellant Management Device (MAPMD) system includes the membrane floating on the propellant surface and a control system that utilizes low-power electromagnetic coils to detect the position of the membrane within the tank, assess the slosh state of the liquid within the tank, and apply appropriate magnetic forces to the floating membrane to suppress incipient slosh.

The slosh test bed at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) is an experimental setup consisting of a dynamic force balance with three movable arms attached to a single axis actuator from Aerotech called Linear Motion Actuator (LMA). A pair of FUTEK LCM 300 (Tension and Compression) dynamic load cell is attached at the end of each movable arms. The sensitivity of the load cell is rated at 250 lbs or 1112 N. These load cells measure the forces acting on tank walls and resolve them into forces and moments. Motion of the actuator is accomplished by a custom built LabVIEW code coupled with Aerotech’s soloist CP software at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

The test tank is a clear polycarbonate cylindrical vessel of diameter 6 inches and length 8 inches. The external control system consists of two external wire coils each consisting of 100 turns of 12-AWG magnet winding wire, and (2) programmable DC power supplies capable of providing 1A of current at 12V. The coils are spaced at intervals equal to the coil radius, effectively creating a series of Helmholtz Coils. The Helmholtz configuration is advantageous because it creates a region of uniform magnetic field between two coils when the current supplied to each coil is the same. As a result, over 90% of the tank volume can be subjected to a constant, static magnetic field enough to stiffen the membrane and suppress slosh.

The proposed MAPMD addresses all the challenges stated above through a simple, innovative solution that could prove to be cost effective and lead to better control performance of satellites, space craft and launch vehicles.

 

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