Author Information

Michaelle RamosFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Daytona Beach

Poster Session; 3-minute Recorded Presentation

Authors' Class Standing

Michaelle Ramos, Junior Lauren Kibler, Senior Thomas Jones, Sophomore Malek Morris, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Michaelle Ramos

Faculty Mentor Name

Andrei Ludu

Abstract

Sloshing of liquid propellants is a serious issue when it comes to space flight and rocket propulsion. Liquid propellant sloshing in rocket engines can induce bank angle changes which have been proven to lead to catastrophic failures.

There are three times during flight where sloshing is a major concern. The first of which is takeoff, max Q, main engine cut off or second engine cut off. When a spacecraft experiences acceleration, the propellant settles to the bottom of the tank and has a rough and nearly flat free surface perpendicular to the thrust vector of the engine. For the purpose of thrust vector control during a main engine burn, several gimbal actuators may be used to articulate the engine thrust vector and aim the thrust vector through the spacecraft’s center of mass. This introduces lateral acceleration disturbances and the propellant responds by forming standing waves on the free surfaces, which is called sloshing.

The main goal of this research is to design a structure to generate sloshing within a tank and collect data with sensors and high-speed cameras. This data would then be used to develop a method to then diminish the sloshing and implemented into future research and designs.

We are constructed a sloshing mechanism unit to generate sloshing of liquid propellant within the tank. We will collect data with sensors and high speed cameras. We are awaiting final parts to come in to collect data.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark, SURF, Research Abroad, Student Internal Grants, or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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Diminishing Liquid Propellant Sloshing in Rocket Engines

Sloshing of liquid propellants is a serious issue when it comes to space flight and rocket propulsion. Liquid propellant sloshing in rocket engines can induce bank angle changes which have been proven to lead to catastrophic failures.

There are three times during flight where sloshing is a major concern. The first of which is takeoff, max Q, main engine cut off or second engine cut off. When a spacecraft experiences acceleration, the propellant settles to the bottom of the tank and has a rough and nearly flat free surface perpendicular to the thrust vector of the engine. For the purpose of thrust vector control during a main engine burn, several gimbal actuators may be used to articulate the engine thrust vector and aim the thrust vector through the spacecraft’s center of mass. This introduces lateral acceleration disturbances and the propellant responds by forming standing waves on the free surfaces, which is called sloshing.

The main goal of this research is to design a structure to generate sloshing within a tank and collect data with sensors and high-speed cameras. This data would then be used to develop a method to then diminish the sloshing and implemented into future research and designs.

We are constructed a sloshing mechanism unit to generate sloshing of liquid propellant within the tank. We will collect data with sensors and high speed cameras. We are awaiting final parts to come in to collect data.

 

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