Abstract Title

Looking Towards the Future of Bicycle Transportation

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

individual

Daytona Beach

Authors' Class Standing

Charles Hruda, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Charles Hruda

Lead Presenter's College

DB College of Engineering

Faculty Mentor Name

Scott Parr

Abstract

In recent years emphasis on bicycle transportation has increased, resulting from urban areas looking for alternatives to cars on the roadway and this demand has led to research aimed at finding solutions to questions of safety and equity. Bike transportation can only replace traditional modes of travel if it is easily accessible to large groups of people, which it currently is not. European infrastructure designs are the current standard; however, American implementation of those systems has continually failed to capture the attention and trust of marginalized communities. Promoting cycling as an activity before a primary method of transportation and allowing users of micro mobility to believe the organizers have their interests at heart may begin to increase equity among bicycle transport. In regards to safety experimental testing of the effectiveness of road markings’ color and pattern on cyclists attention has been conducted, from which conclusions on bike lane design can be drawn, protecting their growing number of users.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark, SURF, Research Abroad, Student Internal Grants, or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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Looking Towards the Future of Bicycle Transportation

In recent years emphasis on bicycle transportation has increased, resulting from urban areas looking for alternatives to cars on the roadway and this demand has led to research aimed at finding solutions to questions of safety and equity. Bike transportation can only replace traditional modes of travel if it is easily accessible to large groups of people, which it currently is not. European infrastructure designs are the current standard; however, American implementation of those systems has continually failed to capture the attention and trust of marginalized communities. Promoting cycling as an activity before a primary method of transportation and allowing users of micro mobility to believe the organizers have their interests at heart may begin to increase equity among bicycle transport. In regards to safety experimental testing of the effectiveness of road markings’ color and pattern on cyclists attention has been conducted, from which conclusions on bike lane design can be drawn, protecting their growing number of users.