Title of the Presentation

MMS: An Inspiration/Opportunity for Near and Distant Future Missions: TRACERS and MAKOS

Presentation Type

Talk

Presenter Format

In Person Meeting Talk

Topic

Dayside Science

Start Date

10-5-2022 11:15 AM

Abstract

The Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission was launched in 2015 with the objective to observe the electron diffusion region of magnetic reconnection. Since its launch, it has produced thousands of scientific publications. The investigations made possible by MMS have critically advanced our understanding of kinetic-scale space plasma physics, particularly on the process of magnetic reconnection. It has also, as any good mission should, inspired more questions that must be answered. How does magnetic reconnection behave more globally? What other essential kinetic-scale processes should we resolve next? In this talk, we intend to highlight planned and not so planned missions that seek to address those questions. The first is TRACERS (Tandem Reconnection and Cusp Electrodynamics Reconnaissance Satellites), which will use the Earth’s Cusp to study spatially vs temporally variable reconnection. The second is MAKOS (Multipoint Assessment of the Kinematics Of Shocks), a Heliophysics concept mission aiming to finally resolve and study the microphysics of the terrestrial bow shock and assess their place and role in the shock’s overall conversion of energy. TRACERS will launch in 2024, providing ample opportunities for conjunction studies with MMS. MAKOS will be submitted to the Decadal survey in an effort to enhance our community’s ability to study more fundamental plasma processes and build on MMS’s work.

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May 10th, 11:15 AM

MMS: An Inspiration/Opportunity for Near and Distant Future Missions: TRACERS and MAKOS

The Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission was launched in 2015 with the objective to observe the electron diffusion region of magnetic reconnection. Since its launch, it has produced thousands of scientific publications. The investigations made possible by MMS have critically advanced our understanding of kinetic-scale space plasma physics, particularly on the process of magnetic reconnection. It has also, as any good mission should, inspired more questions that must be answered. How does magnetic reconnection behave more globally? What other essential kinetic-scale processes should we resolve next? In this talk, we intend to highlight planned and not so planned missions that seek to address those questions. The first is TRACERS (Tandem Reconnection and Cusp Electrodynamics Reconnaissance Satellites), which will use the Earth’s Cusp to study spatially vs temporally variable reconnection. The second is MAKOS (Multipoint Assessment of the Kinematics Of Shocks), a Heliophysics concept mission aiming to finally resolve and study the microphysics of the terrestrial bow shock and assess their place and role in the shock’s overall conversion of energy. TRACERS will launch in 2024, providing ample opportunities for conjunction studies with MMS. MAKOS will be submitted to the Decadal survey in an effort to enhance our community’s ability to study more fundamental plasma processes and build on MMS’s work.