Presenter Email

ryan.wallace@erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

13-8-2018 3:15 PM

End Date

13-8-2018 4:15 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Keywords

small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS), near mid-air collision (NMAC), interference, AeroScope

Streaming Media

Abstract

The rapid rise of small UAS (sUAS) operations in the National Airspace System is generating an increasing concern about possible interference with manned aircraft. Reported sightings of UAS by manned aircraft pilots rose from an average of 147 sightings per month in 2016 to 188 sightings per month in the first three quarters of 2017. The purpose of this study was to evaluate sUAS operator behaviors and identify sUAS interference with aviation operations in the sample area. The authors partnered with a UAS technology company to deploy an AeroScope, a passive radio frequency detection device, in proximity to Tampa International Airport to detect UAS flight activity. While the device only collected data from DJI platforms, the company is estimated to hold a more than 70% market share on consumer UAS in the United States. The AeroScope identified 77 unique sUAS platforms among 258 separate flight detection records over the 19-day sampling period. The research yielded several behavior characteristics of the sUAS operators including predominant sUAS models, operating altitudes, preferred flying days and times, flight durations, and launch locations. Additionally, the authors identified 93 potential violations of 14 CFR 107 regulations, which included breaches of controlled airspace, maximum altitude limits, daytime flying rules, and other provisions. The authors assessed the sUAS activity posed a potential conflict with a visual approach path to a nearby airport and created a collision hazard to three local heliports. The authors highlighted limitations of existing sUAS geofencing to protecting aviation operations in high-density airspace.

Presenter Biography

Dr. Ryan Wallace is an Assistant Professor of Aeronautical Science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida. He holds an Ed.D. in Applied Education Studies (Aviation Sciences option), a M.S. in Aviation, and a B.S. in Aeronautics. His research focuses on unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) safety, security, human factors, and public policy. He is currently an Educator Trustee and Chair of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Committee for the University Aviation Association. Dr. Wallace co-chairs the UAS-Enabled Security Operations Team for the Department of Homeland Security’s Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council (CIPAC) UAS Security Working Group. He is also a representative on the Federal Aviation Administration’s Unmanned Aircraft Safety Team (UAST). He serves as Editor of the International Journal of Professional Aviation Training & Testing Research and the Collegiate Aviation Review International. He previously worked as a Customer Training Specialist at the Boeing Company on the E-7T Airborne Early Warning & Control program. An Air Force veteran, he was a rated Air Battle Manager on the E-3 AWACS, where he accumulated more than 1,500 flight hours.

View Ryan Wallace's Bio Page

1219 Wallace, Haritos, Robbins.pptx (16370 kB)
Original PPT Presentation

Share

COinS
 
Aug 13th, 3:15 PM Aug 13th, 4:15 PM

Assessing Small UAS Operator Flight Behavior and Potential Interference with Aviation Operations in Controlled Airspace

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

The rapid rise of small UAS (sUAS) operations in the National Airspace System is generating an increasing concern about possible interference with manned aircraft. Reported sightings of UAS by manned aircraft pilots rose from an average of 147 sightings per month in 2016 to 188 sightings per month in the first three quarters of 2017. The purpose of this study was to evaluate sUAS operator behaviors and identify sUAS interference with aviation operations in the sample area. The authors partnered with a UAS technology company to deploy an AeroScope, a passive radio frequency detection device, in proximity to Tampa International Airport to detect UAS flight activity. While the device only collected data from DJI platforms, the company is estimated to hold a more than 70% market share on consumer UAS in the United States. The AeroScope identified 77 unique sUAS platforms among 258 separate flight detection records over the 19-day sampling period. The research yielded several behavior characteristics of the sUAS operators including predominant sUAS models, operating altitudes, preferred flying days and times, flight durations, and launch locations. Additionally, the authors identified 93 potential violations of 14 CFR 107 regulations, which included breaches of controlled airspace, maximum altitude limits, daytime flying rules, and other provisions. The authors assessed the sUAS activity posed a potential conflict with a visual approach path to a nearby airport and created a collision hazard to three local heliports. The authors highlighted limitations of existing sUAS geofencing to protecting aviation operations in high-density airspace.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.